Modern decline of westerns.

New or old, regardless of format, we love talking about movies and the people who make them

Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Kevin » Sun Sep 21, 2008 11:41 am

The movie business became too full of big blockbuster Westerns. Silverado (good), Dances with Wolves (good), Tombstone (good), Quigley Down Under (decent), Unforgiven (great), Wyatt Earp (though a failure), Legends of the Fall (decent), etc. I think that's why we don't see Westerns as much anymore, because when they are made, it's like an all at once sort of thing.

It's kind of parallel to the decline of Star Trek. Star Trek was always on TV in one form or another in the mid 90s. Re-runs of TOS, TNG, with the new DS9, Voyager series, and 3 new TNG movies in the 90s with re-runs of the original 6 films.
User avatar
Kevin
City Attorney
 
Posts: 327
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 8:36 am

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby J.M. Vargas » Sun Sep 21, 2008 12:45 pm

I'll get back to you tomorrow after I catch an afternoon showing of Ed Harris' "Apaloosa." 8) Yes, because of a million and one variables (cost, falling out of favor, lack of new ideas, etc.) the western is now relegated to ocassional appearances a few times per year. But remember that from the golden age of radio (1930's) until the early 1970's (when "Gunsmoke" went off the air) there were westerns on radio, TV and the movies non-stop. Every conceivable metaphor about man's struggles to tame the Wild West were explored, then re-explored and then redone a dozen times over on movies and TV for decades. Even when westerns fell out of flavor their replacements (like Vic Morrow's "Combat!" TV series) still retained the archetype structures and just switched the locales/characters. The "Star Trek" shows you mentioned (and outer space or post-apocalyptic sci-fi settings in general) is the closest we have left to westerns since they deal with men exploring/conquering unknown and dangeroes territory, which on planet Earth means going underwater or into a deep dark cave. Be glad we have old western movies and TV shows to look back at for our western fix when new western material is scarce because a lot of people back in the 50's and 60's were pretty poe'd they couldn't turn on the radio/TV or go to the movies without a western getting in their way of other types/genres of pop culture entertainment.
'You can't make chicken salad out of chicken s***'
User avatar
J.M. Vargas
County Prosecutor
 
Posts: 3120
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2004 6:23 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby mavrach » Sun Sep 21, 2008 12:51 pm

I think the problem with westerns is that anybody who hasn't known them (i.e. just about anybody under 40), thinks of them by the stereotypes of the genre: cowboys with funny hats and stirrups, sayings like "yeehaw" and "giddy-up," obligatory archetypes like the school marm and the sherrif.

Talk to any kid today. They'll tell you they don't like westerns, regardless of whether or not they've actually ever seen one.

I have this problem whenever I try to recommend something like The Good the Bad and the Ugly to somebody. They avoid this absolutely stunning movie because they think Eastwood is going to say "howdy partner!" The few who get through and see one of these are usually shocked to find that they like the movie. The problem is that these kids make up the backbone of film revenue, hence the lack of good westerns.
+1. this is very interesting.
User avatar
mavrach
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1728
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 11:41 am
Location: North Jersey, at the end of a one-way dead-end road.

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Kevin » Sun Sep 21, 2008 1:19 pm

mavrach wrote:I think the problem with westerns is that anybody who hasn't known them (i.e. just about anybody under 40), thinks of them by the stereotypes of the genre: cowboys with funny hats and stirrups, sayings like "yeehaw" and "giddy-up," obligatory archetypes like the school marm and the sherrif.

Talk to any kid today. They'll tell you they don't like westerns, regardless of whether or not they've actually ever seen one.

I have this problem whenever I try to recommend something like The Good the Bad and the Ugly to somebody. They avoid this absolutely stunning movie because they think Eastwood is going to say "howdy partner!" The few who get through and see one of these are usually shocked to find that they like the movie. The problem is that these kids make up the backbone of film revenue, hence the lack of good westerns.


So because of these kids, instead of getting films like Silverado and Unforgiven, we're getting Disaster Movie and Epic Movie?
User avatar
Kevin
City Attorney
 
Posts: 327
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 8:36 am

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby J.M. Vargas » Sun Sep 21, 2008 1:49 pm

^^^ Pretty much. Look at recent westerns like "Apaloosa" (on limited release), "The Assassination of Jessee James..." and the remake of "3:10 To Yuma." They're clearly aimed at an older audience even with youth-appealing stars like Christian Bale (I have no doubt a few youngsters went to see "3:10" just because Bruce Wayne was in it! :roll: ) or Academy voters, which is why a western only debuts theatrically in slow months of Spring (dumping) or Fall (awards season). You'll only see a western in summer when it's a star vehicle, ala 1999's "Wild Wild West," that is guaranteed to bring in the kids (to see Will Smith).
'You can't make chicken salad out of chicken s***'
User avatar
J.M. Vargas
County Prosecutor
 
Posts: 3120
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2004 6:23 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Dimwitted » Sun Sep 21, 2008 3:42 pm

It's cyclical. If someone like Eastwood has a story to tell, makes a movie and it does well, suddenly Westerns will be hot and we'll get a couple of dozen more that try to "cash in". Right now Sci-fi has been burnt out but the new Trek film might jump start that in 2009 and Westerns are clearly on the back burner.
Looking into my crystal ball I see a remake of Gunsmoke by 2011 just because there's such a paucity of new ideas coming out of H'wood.
Dimwitted
City Prosecutor
 
Posts: 840
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:51 pm

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Dan Mancini » Sun Sep 21, 2008 4:43 pm

All of the examples you listed above are actually exceptions to the rule. As a widely successful genre, the Western has been dead in Hollywood since the 1960s.
User avatar
Dan Mancini
Chief Prosecutor
 
Posts: 4055
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:17 am
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Steve T Power » Mon Sep 22, 2008 6:49 am

Dan Mancini wrote:All of the examples you listed above are actually exceptions to the rule. As a widely successful genre, the Western has been dead in Hollywood since the 1960s.


Dan beat me to it. The Western hasn't really been prime since the 50's. Since the 60's we've gotten a few STELLAR westerns throughout each decade, and those are what is fondly remembered now. The more self-aware "post modern" westerns.

As for what's been out there in the last little while, i tend to think Silverado and Tombstone (while enjoyable romps in their own right) are a touch overrated as westerns (almost TOO self aware, they play more like anachronistic action flicks), while i personally find Wyatt Earp to be a modern classic of the genre. This coming from the guy who's favorite film of last year was The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford... So i guess you can tell which side of the western coin my tastes lie.

Appaloosa looks fantastic, and i'll be checking it out when the opportunity presents itself.

And why no mention of The Proposition? Amazing, brutal, ugly film, but a western through and through.
As the ancient Tibetan philosophy states:"Don't start none... won't be none...".
User avatar
Steve T Power
Judge
 
Posts: 5351
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 3:08 pm
Location: St. John's, Newfoundland, CA

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Dan Mancini » Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:20 am

Steve T Power wrote:...while i personally find Wyatt Earp to be a modern classic of the genre.

I need to see that flick again. It's been years. Quaid is frighteningly awesome in it. He should've won an Oscar.

Tombstone is more light entertainment -- hardly a classic of the genre. But it's damn difficult not to be entertained when you have Kurt Russell kicking ass, Val Kilmer punking everyone in sight, and Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, and Stephen Lang acting like total douche bags.
User avatar
Dan Mancini
Chief Prosecutor
 
Posts: 4055
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:17 am
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Neal Masri » Mon Sep 22, 2008 10:14 am

Dan Mancini wrote:
Steve T Power wrote:...while i personally find Wyatt Earp to be a modern classic of the genre.

I need to see that flick again. It's been years. Quaid is frighteningly awesome in it. He should've won an Oscar.

Tombstone is more light entertainment -- hardly a classic of the genre. But it's damn difficult not to be entertained when you have Kurt Russell kicking ass, Val Kilmer punking everyone in sight, and Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, and Stephen Lang acting like total douche bags.


It's so nice to hear I'm not the only one who thought Wyatt Earp was awesome. The director's cut is highly recommended. I wouldn't call the westenr dead, it just seems to be defined by the exceptions to the rule that come along every few years. I personally loved Open Range. Also, I'm a huge booster of Deadwood. I still stand behind my review of season 2 where I said something like almost any given episode is as good as or better than 90% of big budget feature films out there now.
We're not here to talk nonsense to Bob Loblaw.
User avatar
Neal Masri
Judge (Retired)
 
Posts: 162
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 11:25 am
Location: Richmond, Va

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Steve T Power » Mon Sep 22, 2008 10:24 am

Neal Masri wrote:
Dan Mancini wrote:
Steve T Power wrote:...while i personally find Wyatt Earp to be a modern classic of the genre.

I need to see that flick again. It's been years. Quaid is frighteningly awesome in it. He should've won an Oscar.

Tombstone is more light entertainment -- hardly a classic of the genre. But it's damn difficult not to be entertained when you have Kurt Russell kicking ass, Val Kilmer punking everyone in sight, and Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, and Stephen Lang acting like total douche bags.


It's so nice to hear I'm not the only one who thought Wyatt Earp was awesome. The director's cut is highly recommended. I wouldn't call the westenr dead, it just seems to be defined by the exceptions to the rule that come along every few years. I personally loved Open Range. Also, I'm a huge booster of Deadwood. I still stand behind my review of season 2 where I said something like almost any given episode is as good as or better than 90% of big budget feature films out there now.


Agreed all around - i personally consider Deadwood to be the best thing i've seen come out of television in the last 10 years or so, and I too am a huge fan of Open Range, When Costner does western i usually pay attention.
As the ancient Tibetan philosophy states:"Don't start none... won't be none...".
User avatar
Steve T Power
Judge
 
Posts: 5351
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 3:08 pm
Location: St. John's, Newfoundland, CA

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby tucco » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:19 pm

I think Road House was a good example an archetypal western-theme (drifter vs. town bully)
in a modern setting if you wanna go that way...

"Guys like Brad Wesley keep taking and taking until someone takes HEE-IM"

I gotta say as far as DANCES WITH WOLVES, I think it's a poor man's A MAN CALLED HORSE

But I think at the risk of sounding cynical that everything's been done in the western format as far as what we're used to/what we expect.
"See no evil, Speak no evil, Hear no evil, have no Fun"
tucco
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1278
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 9:34 pm
Location: WARWICK, RI

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby J.M. Vargas » Tue Sep 23, 2008 5:01 am

Went to see "Appaloosa" at a local NYC theater yesterday. Read my thoughts on what I thougt of the movie in the 'Watching' thread. What caught my eye in the mostly-empty theater (on a Monday afternoon) was the demographics of the 25+ people in attendance. Everybody but a couple in their mid-30's and myself (35) were older folks in their late 50's or older. I'm sure when the movie is in wide release and on a weekend a lot of young folks will show up, but to see the movie with a mostly older crowd was a reminder of just how low in most young moviegoer's radar the western has fallen.
'You can't make chicken salad out of chicken s***'
User avatar
J.M. Vargas
County Prosecutor
 
Posts: 3120
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2004 6:23 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Dan Mancini » Tue Sep 23, 2008 6:07 am

Steve T Power wrote:I too am a huge fan of Open Range

It's Costner's best western. Easily.
User avatar
Dan Mancini
Chief Prosecutor
 
Posts: 4055
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:17 am
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby HGervais » Tue Sep 23, 2008 10:21 am

Dan Mancini wrote:
Steve T Power wrote:I too am a huge fan of Open Range

It's Costner's best western. Easily.

Easily and far away his best western.
"The most dementing of all modern sins: the inability to distinquish excellence from success."-David Hare
User avatar
HGervais
Judge
 
Posts: 4725
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 12:14 am
Location: Greater New Orleans

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Dunnyman » Tue Sep 23, 2008 1:30 pm

Dan Mancini wrote:All of the examples you listed above are actually exceptions to the rule. As a widely successful genre, the Western has been dead in Hollywood since Blazing Saddles.

Fixed!
"I ain't a boy, no I'm a man, and I believe in the Promised Land"
-Coming to the USA on January 20, 2009!
User avatar
Dunnyman
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2004 12:37 am
Location: Seattle

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby tucco » Tue Sep 23, 2008 1:41 pm

The Apple Dumpling Gang just couldn't be matched, so they stopped trying.....
"See no evil, Speak no evil, Hear no evil, have no Fun"
tucco
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1278
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 9:34 pm
Location: WARWICK, RI

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby sneakers » Tue Sep 23, 2008 3:05 pm

I guess you haven't seen Six Reasons Why

Image
Pissing the world off one person at a time.
sneakers
City Attorney
 
Posts: 426
Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 6:23 pm
Location: Chicago

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby hoytereden » Tue Sep 23, 2008 9:25 pm

J.M. Vargas wrote:Went to see "Appaloosa" at a local NYC theater yesterday. Read my thoughts on what I thougt of the movie in the 'Watching' thread. What caught my eye in the mostly-empty theater (on a Monday afternoon) was the demographics of the 25+ people in attendance. Everybody but a couple in their mid-30's and myself (35) were older folks in their late 50's or older. I'm sure when the movie is in wide release and on a weekend a lot of young folks will show up, but to see the movie with a mostly older crowd was a reminder of just how low in most young moviegoer's radar the western has fallen.


I would fall into that late 50's category. Watching Leave it to Beaver (part of my generation's tv viewing when it originally ran) today had a telling reference about tv programming back then-June and Ward are talking and one asks the other-"What movie did the boys see?"-How the West was Won. Ward replies-"Well, you'd think after years of watching tv they'd know how it was won!" Very true! I grew up a lot of westerns on tv. The mid-to-late 50's had a decline in the number of westerns playing in the theaters but they just moved over to the small screen and flourished. During those years I went to the movies to see the great, and not so great, Sci-Fi and Horror films and then, a little later, the Sandal & Spear epics. I guesss my long winded point is-Yea, I dislike the frequency that they're doing westerns these days but, by the same token, usually the ones that are made are pretty good and, if not, there's always DVDs of the old ones.
"You can lead a horse to water but a pencil must be lead"-Stan Laurel
Moe-"Were you scared?" Larry-"No, just apprehensive." Moe-"Apprehensive, that's a pretty big word.What's it mean?" Larry-"That's scared with a college education!"
User avatar
hoytereden
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1083
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2003 5:24 pm
Location: The Big Island of Hawaii

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Dan Mancini » Wed Sep 24, 2008 4:24 am

Dunnyman wrote:
Dan Mancini wrote:All of the examples you listed above are actually exceptions to the rule. As a widely successful genre, the Western has been dead in Hollywood since Blazing Saddles.

Fixed!

Somebody's gonna have to go back and get a sh*tload of dimes!
User avatar
Dan Mancini
Chief Prosecutor
 
Posts: 4055
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:17 am
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Jon Mercer » Wed Sep 24, 2008 5:46 am

Aw sh*t!! Quicksand!
User avatar
Jon Mercer
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1203
Joined: Thu Feb 26, 2004 10:41 am
Location: St. John's, NL

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby ramkumar » Sun Jul 10, 2011 8:27 am

I hope they will stage a come back some day, you may never know.
ramkumar
Law Clerk
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2011 8:09 pm

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby the5thghostbuster » Sun Jul 10, 2011 5:43 pm

ramkumar wrote:I hope they will stage a come back some day, you may never know.


Welcome to the Jury Room!
User avatar
the5thghostbuster
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1229
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2005 9:17 pm
Location: The Great Country of the North

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby mkiker2089 » Sun Jul 10, 2011 6:50 pm

The problem with Westerns is that the genre has too many rules. To be a "western" it has to be set in the wild west of the USA, perhaps Mexico but usually USA. It has to involve gunfights, lawlessness, loose women who usually have one outspoken one to act as all women during the movie with the others being filler etc..

Sci-Fi has less rules. You can have Mark Twain in sci-fi, but you can't have him in a western. Horror is the same, well a horror with Mark Twain would be odd but it can happen.

Thus "westerns" are indeed dead never to return. Some good movies that happened to be set in the west have followed.
-Marshall-
Nun sacciu, nun vidi, nun ceru e si ceru durmiv.
I know nothing, I see nothing, I wasn't there,
and if I was there, I was asleep.
User avatar
mkiker2089
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1372
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2002 1:45 am
Location: Utopia

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Dan Mancini » Mon Jul 11, 2011 5:45 am

mkiker2089 wrote:The problem with Westerns is that the genre has too many rules. To be a "western" it has to be set in the wild west of the USA, perhaps Mexico but usually USA. It has to involve gunfights, lawlessness, loose women who usually have one outspoken one to act as all women during the movie with the others being filler etc..

Sci-Fi has less rules. You can have Mark Twain in sci-fi, but you can't have him in a western. Horror is the same, well a horror with Mark Twain would be odd but it can happen.

Thus "westerns" are indeed dead never to return. Some good movies that happened to be set in the west have followed.

Um, no.
User avatar
Dan Mancini
Chief Prosecutor
 
Posts: 4055
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:17 am
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby mkiker2089 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:25 am

No to what. You don't think Mark Twain could be cast as a homicidal maniac in a horror movie? I could write up a decent script. I have one where he fights an evil cyborg Winston Churchill in my laptop somewhere.

As for the western rules, those are pretty much set in stone. Otherwise it's just a period piece movie. A western set in New York wouldn't work. A western set in Transylvania also would not work. The genre is limited. Just thank god they got rid of the yodeling requirement. Singing cowboys wouldn't work at all.

Westerns have specific rules. What other genres have as many? Sci-fi is just something with science as a background regardless of setting. Horror is just something meant to be spooky. Actually thinking on it westerns are less of a full genre and more of a sub-genre.
-Marshall-
Nun sacciu, nun vidi, nun ceru e si ceru durmiv.
I know nothing, I see nothing, I wasn't there,
and if I was there, I was asleep.
User avatar
mkiker2089
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1372
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2002 1:45 am
Location: Utopia

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Dan Mancini » Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:45 am

mkiker2089 wrote:No to what. You don't think Mark Twain could be cast as a homicidal maniac in a horror movie? I could write up a decent script. I have one where he fights an evil cyborg Winston Churchill in my laptop somewhere.

As for the western rules, those are pretty much set in stone. Otherwise it's just a period piece movie. A western set in New York wouldn't work. A western set in Transylvania also would not work. The genre is limited. Just thank god they got rid of the yodeling requirement. Singing cowboys wouldn't work at all.

Westerns have specific rules. What other genres have as many? Sci-fi is just something with science as a background regardless of setting. Horror is just something meant to be spooky. Actually thinking on it westerns are less of a full genre and more of a sub-genre.

Comparing scifi and westerns is comparing apples and oranges. Yes, the western must be set...wait for it...in the west. And? The rest of the examples you cite are nonsense (in the sense that many of those archetypes bubble around through tons of westerns, but none are requirements).

Westerns can always comment on modern American culture and society (of whatever era) better than any other genre. Because it is a fundamentally American genre. Westerns will be around as long as the United States is around. Will they ever be as big as they were in the '50s? Who knows? Who cares?

What other subgenre has specific rules? Uh, samurai films, which, lo and behold, are the Japanese analog to the western. Like westerns, some samurai flicks are pulpy, some are high art, some are in between. Regardless, the genre persists because it is always possible to make a samurai movie that says something about life in Japan today (regardless of when today is).

The western's been "dead" for 50 years now, yet filmmakers keep making them and they keep succeeding commercially and artistically to one degree or another across every single decade since their supposed demise.
User avatar
Dan Mancini
Chief Prosecutor
 
Posts: 4055
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:17 am
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Andrew Forbes » Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:16 am

Moreover, why can't a Western be a sci-fi film? Or a horror film? In fact, I'd argue that it doesn't even have to be set in the American west anymore. The western can be defined by its setting, by its conventions, or both. Red Hill, Sukiyaki Western Django, The Good, The Bad, The Weird and The Proposition are all westerns, despite being set on different continents. I can think of few film groupings with titles as disparate in tone or theme as The Quick and the Dead, The Misfits, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and Treasure of the Sierra Madre, yet they are all westerns of one form or another.
Formerly chamucamel
User avatar
Andrew Forbes
County Prosecutor
 
Posts: 2615
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 9:43 am
Location: Edmonton, AB

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby mkiker2089 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:46 am

I see, we disagree on what westerns are. If you ask people in general, not movie fans who come here but the common person on the street, what would they see as a western? That's where my set of "rules" came from. However in a wider sense I can see other movies as having a similar feel. People have compared Firefly to westerns for example. Which to me just proves more that sci-fi is versatile than saying anything about westerns. That's just my perspective though as someone who likes sci-fi and movies that happen to be set in the west but not most "westerns". Perhaps I've seen the bad ones and don't equate the good ones with the genre.

For what it's worth I never cared for Samurai films either.
-Marshall-
Nun sacciu, nun vidi, nun ceru e si ceru durmiv.
I know nothing, I see nothing, I wasn't there,
and if I was there, I was asleep.
User avatar
mkiker2089
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1372
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2002 1:45 am
Location: Utopia

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Bryan Pope » Mon Jul 11, 2011 12:34 pm

mkiker2089 wrote:Horror is the same, well a horror with Mark Twain would be odd but it can happen.

Or horror with Wilkie Collins plotting the death of Charles Dickens. (Dammit, Guillermo Del Toro, would you hurry up and direct Drood already?!)

But I respectfully disagree with your thesis. Show me a writer constrained by the "rules" of the Western and I'll show you a writer who lacks imagination and vision. Larry McMurtry has taken the western interesting and unexpected places, borrowing the conventions of the western only to break them (for example, Lonesome Dove and The Berrybender Narratives). Ditto McCabe & Mrs. Miller. I would even hold up Richard Donner's Maverick as an example. It has many of the same conventions, but it's a lighthearted romp.
Agnes, it's me...Billy.
User avatar
Bryan Pope
Judge
 
Posts: 833
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 10:44 am
Location: Texas

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Attrage » Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:38 pm

Dan Mancini wrote:
Steve T Power wrote:...while i personally find Wyatt Earp to be a modern classic of the genre.

I need to see that flick again. It's been years. Quaid is frighteningly awesome in it. He should've won an Oscar.

Tombstone is more light entertainment -- hardly a classic of the genre. But it's damn difficult not to be entertained when you have Kurt Russell kicking ass, Val Kilmer punking everyone in sight, and Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, and Stephen Lang acting like total douche bags.


Tombstone is home to one of cinema's greatest lines, let's not forget..."I want your blood. And I want your soul. And I want 'em both, right now."
Don't worry darling, its just a hat, belonging to a small man of limited means who lost a fight with a chicken!
User avatar
Attrage
City Attorney
 
Posts: 372
Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 8:47 pm

Re: Modern decline of westerns.

Postby Jim_Thomas » Tue Jul 12, 2011 7:23 am

Here's a thought: a Supreme Court review analyzing the two films.
Jim_Thomas
Judge
 
Posts: 432
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 10:40 am


Return to Movies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 2 guests