'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby stypee » Sun Mar 21, 2010 1:58 pm

Okay, so we all know that I watched the "CItizen Kane" of bad movies The Room and loved every second of it..

My other viewings...

The Passion of The Christ Blu-Ray - This is a tough one for me. I first saw it in the theatre upon it's release and was really affected by it. I got wrapped up in the whole thing. Now, seeing it for a second time, I must confess, it really is a torture movie. There is so much focus on watching Christ getting tortured that it becomes a distraction. It gets painful to watch and not in the intended way either. I'm really upset that I feel this way about the film for the second time, I really thought it had some sort of profound impact but in reality, it doesn't. Gibson spends so much time abusing Jesus, every second after the first 20 minutes has someone whipping him. It is, quite frankly, a very unpleasant viewing experience.

Blow Blu-Ray - See my post about the weird transfer... Ted Demme had a great talent. I really enjoyed this film the second time around. Depp is just amazing, in my humble opinion. I'm really sad that Ted Demme had to leave us in such an early stage of his career. He was a wonderful and very much appreciated director.

500 Days of Summer Blu-Ray - Kind of on the fence about this one. Joseph Gordon Levitt is an outstanding and very much appreciated actor, he shines in this movie. There is just something, that I feel, missing from this occasionally charming little movie. I don't want to say too much because I don't want to create spoilers, it should be seen at least once, it's shot beautifully, I just wish there was something else to fill the void. A key scene doesn't really hold up to it's muster. I feel as if something else needed to be explained and resolved and it just didn't do it for me. Maybe some of you feel the same way as I do, perhaps I missed the boat.. yet... again.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby Andrew Forbes » Sun Mar 21, 2010 3:09 pm

The Ninth Gate. I don't really get the hate for this one. Sure, it's no Rosemary's Baby, but what is (and, let's face it, even Rosemary had its share of ridiculous moments). Gate for the most part succeeds in setting a mood of quiet dread, with a healthy dose of Polanski's dark humor. Clearly, he finds as much absurdity in the premise as anyone. Not even the obvious process shots during driving sequences bothered me, since it's something of a throwback, anyway. All things considered, it's a solid little supernatural noir/treasure hunt.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby Dunnyman » Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:53 am

Casablanca on Blu-Ray. My best friend remained unconvinced of Blu-Ray's amazing qualities, so I put the first version of it to hit DVD with it's rather basic transfer, and then put in the Blu-Ray. She bought her player the next day. I'm still blown away by how great a 60 year old movie looks. Hopefully the same love and care will go into the other films of the era.
Corpse Bride on Blu-Ray. I'd forgotten how oddly charming this is.
Then, the grand premiere of a friend's film that was shot in various local spots and includes MY condo in the background of one scene! It's a mystery/thriller about a man who attempts to find out who killed his best friend. Titled "Seattle Death Day", it's bound to be a hit any time now...:-)
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby Andrew Forbes » Wed Mar 24, 2010 7:13 am

Shutter Island. Vague spoilers can be inferred from the following.

Two hours of awesome, followed by the most trite and obvious of Big Twists, rendering all that has gone before meaningless. The ending makes the film less shocking, not more. What made Scorsese feel this was a story that needed telling? The really aggravating thing is that it's told so well. But, really, anagrams?!
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby hoytereden » Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:03 am

I was watching He Walked By Night for the umpteenth time and decided to make a marathon of films that featured sewers as a location. Ended up with the following:
The Third Man
Them
The H-Man

All fun movies. I saw HWBN when I was very young and, to this day, the image I first think of is Richard Basehart running down the tunnels with the flashlight. That, and the scene, where he doctor's himself. OUCH!
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby cdouglas » Wed Mar 24, 2010 12:38 pm

Andrew Forbes wrote:Shutter Island. Vague spoilers can be inferred from the following.

Two hours of awesome, followed by the most trite and obvious of Big Twists, rendering all that has gone before meaningless. The ending makes the film less shocking, not more. What made Scorsese feel this was a story that needed telling? The really aggravating thing is that it's told so well. But, really, anagrams?!


See, the thing for me was that it didn't feel very much like a Big Twist. It's easy to spot from pretty far away, and Scorsese sort of slowly works his way into it rather than just doing a sudden dramatic reveal. I feel like the thing Scorsese was working towards (perhaps explaining why he felt the story needed to be told and why it resonated with him) is found in DiCaprio's final line of dialogue rather than in the plot twist.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby Andrew Forbes » Wed Mar 24, 2010 12:58 pm

cdouglas wrote:
Andrew Forbes wrote:Shutter Island. Vague spoilers can be inferred from the following.

Two hours of awesome, followed by the most trite and obvious of Big Twists, rendering all that has gone before meaningless. The ending makes the film less shocking, not more. What made Scorsese feel this was a story that needed telling? The really aggravating thing is that it's told so well. But, really, anagrams?!


See, the thing for me was that it didn't feel very much like a Big Twist. It's easy to spot from pretty far away, and Scorsese sort of slowly works his way into it rather than just doing a sudden dramatic reveal. I feel like the thing Scorsese was working towards (perhaps explaining why he felt the story needed to be told and why it resonated with him) is found in DiCaprio's final line of dialogue rather than in the plot twist.

I see where you're coming from, but the whole finale seemed to me like it was structured as a big reveal followed by an overly detailed explanation/justification of same. And the final line, while ostensibly weighted with Significance, really does little for me as far as drawing meaning from much of what has gone before. That said, it's a movie that I think will play very differently on a second viewing, and I look forward to revisiting it.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby Andrew Forbes » Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:01 pm

Oh, and it will be a crime if the movie's sound design isn't recognized come award season.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby cdouglas » Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:36 pm

Andrew Forbes wrote:
cdouglas wrote:
Andrew Forbes wrote:Shutter Island. Vague spoilers can be inferred from the following.

Two hours of awesome, followed by the most trite and obvious of Big Twists, rendering all that has gone before meaningless. The ending makes the film less shocking, not more. What made Scorsese feel this was a story that needed telling? The really aggravating thing is that it's told so well. But, really, anagrams?!


See, the thing for me was that it didn't feel very much like a Big Twist. It's easy to spot from pretty far away, and Scorsese sort of slowly works his way into it rather than just doing a sudden dramatic reveal. I feel like the thing Scorsese was working towards (perhaps explaining why he felt the story needed to be told and why it resonated with him) is found in DiCaprio's final line of dialogue rather than in the plot twist.

I see where you're coming from, but the whole finale seemed to me like it was structured as a big reveal followed by an overly detailed explanation/justification of same. And the final line, while ostensibly weighted with Significance, really does little for me as far as drawing meaning from much of what has gone before. That said, it's a movie that I think will play very differently on a second viewing, and I look forward to revisiting it.


It really does. Seeing the film a second time felt very different from my first viewing. Some of the supporting players were compelling in a new way the second time around (particularly Ruffalo and Van Sydow). Agreed on the sound design, too.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby Gabriel Girard » Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:14 pm

cdouglas wrote:
Andrew Forbes wrote:Shutter Island. Vague spoilers can be inferred from the following.

Two hours of awesome, followed by the most trite and obvious of Big Twists, rendering all that has gone before meaningless. The ending makes the film less shocking, not more. What made Scorsese feel this was a story that needed telling? The really aggravating thing is that it's told so well. But, really, anagrams?!


See, the thing for me was that it didn't feel very much like a Big Twist. It's easy to spot from pretty far away, and Scorsese sort of slowly works his way into it rather than just doing a sudden dramatic reveal. I feel like the thing Scorsese was working towards (perhaps explaining why he felt the story needed to be told and why it resonated with him) is found in DiCaprio's final line of dialogue rather than in the plot twist.


Glad to hear this Clark, I haven't seen the movie yet, but the twist is what disappointed me in the book - Lehane is generally awesome but I'm still wondering why he went with such a tired twist.

The Godfather Trilogy - The Coppola restoration. Mainly to see if my feelings for number 3 were the same as the first time I saw it. And they are. The plot is a little to convoluted but I think that this is a very fitting end to the Corleone Saga. That ending still made me cry like a baby. It's worth getting through the film to get to that amazing Opera set piece. As for Sofia, her performance is growing on me and I liked it the first time ;-) And man is that new transfer wonderful, especially on Part II, Gordon Willis really should have won the academy award - he wasn't even nominated!! The Academy preferred nominating Eartquake and giving the award to The Towering Inferno :shock: This in a year with Lenny, Chinatown and Murder On The Orient Express as the other nominees, I will never understand the Academy...
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby J.M. Vargas » Thu Mar 25, 2010 12:15 pm

Been busy at work, running errands, visiting relatives and helping my sister set-up her new HDTV (click http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=18358933#post18358933 and scroll down to see what Blu-rays/DVD's I used while tweaking her TV) to post in this thread for the past couple of weeks. Plus I haven't really watched movies since my free time has been consumed by "Law & Order/SVU/CI" repeats and soccer games on TV. What a life! :(

Federico Fellini's Juliet of the Spirits (1965) on Criterion DVD for the first time. Despite an unending parade of stunning visuals (and in color to boot, a then-first for Fellini) "Juliet of the Spirits" left me mostly cold because of the subdued performance the director squeezes out of his leading lady/wife Giulietta Masina. Having just recently seen "Nights of Cabiria" and "8 1/2" (both of which I loved) it was tough to see the barely-repressed bundle of energy/joy that Masina possesses parade though "Juliet..." with a sour, detached, pained and saddened (sometimes all four at once) look in her face as her housewife character confronts the reality of her husband's martial infidelity. I'm not saying that Masina is a bad actress (far from it, since between "Cabiria" and "Juliet..." she shows her range) but that it's tough to see her husband use her as a straight man to the weird sights (a treehouse/sex club suspended in the air), grotesque characters/caricatures (psychics, private investigators dressed as clergymen, Sandra Milo in multiple roles, etc.) and absurd situations (Suzy's party) Fellini comes up to soothe his fancy. The movie is borderline-catatonic until Giulietta visits Suzy's home 75 minutes into the flick (except for a brief scene of Suzy in the beach) and Nino Rota delivers another playfully majestic score. And who knows, on repeat viewing "Juliet of the Spirits" might grow on me. On first sight though it just feels unforgivable to reduce Giulietta Masina to the uncharacteristic role of passive/reactive spectator to the nightmarish visions inside her head.

Alain Resnais' Mon oncle d'Amérique (1980) on TCM-HD for the first time. My first Resnais movie and the best complement I can pay it is that, as soon as I finished it, I was dying to see it again (which I did... the next day). Using the ideas of world-renound human behavior expert Henri Laborit (who narrates and appears on-camera as himself) to tell the stories of three loosely-connected characters from early childhood to their messy lives as grown-ups in (then) contemporary France, "Mon oncle d'Amérique" is intellectual abstract cinema that feels both traditional (the quick cutaways to old French B&W movies) and unlike anything seen before it (Scorsese borrowed a couple of ideas for "Goodfellas"). It's a testament to Resnais' skills as a filmmaker that, when the notorious 'rats as humans' scenes popped up, I was momentarily shocked but never lost track of the narrative nor burst out laughing (even though the movie has subtle moments of tongue-in-cheek humor to deflate its otherwise dour outlook on life). The movie could still work without the Laborit voice-over/rat scenes given the strong performances the main actors (particularly Gérard Depardie and Nicole Garcia) in making us care for their characters' seemingly-predetermined fate. But with its unique Resnais touches catapulting it into my personal-best stratosphere "Mon oncle d'Amérique" made me want to check out "Last Year at Marieband" (a flick I had zero interest in seeing prior to seeing this one).

Koyaanisqatsi (1983) on MGM-HD for the first time. Having seen "Baraka" on Blu-ray (which is stunning) "Koyaanisqatsi" feels more like a warm-up in which the filmmakers are too much in love with their then-new gimmick of sped-up photography. While "Baraka" also has sped-up segments they're few and thematically sound, unlike the overkill with which producer/director Godfrey Reggio indulges with this technique. That said, and despite not looking as clean and sharp as "Baraka" (the master used for the MGM-HD showing clearly hasn't been restored), the combination of Philip Glass-composed scores and America-as-an-ant-farm subject matter is a potent one. I wish there had been more close-ups of people than Reggio has to humanize the movie a little, but the handful of faces in "Koyaanisqatsi" make an impact (as does the judicious use of well-chosen stock footage). It's nearing its 30th anniversary in a few years but the resource-consuming, fast-living and little-man-crushing America of 1983 hasn't changed much in the decades since this movie was released. The lasting legacy of "Koyaanisqatsi" (besides its sequels and popularization of sped-up photography) to me is that it provided writer/cinematographer/editor Ron Fricke with the learning curve he needed to go on his own and create the far-superior "Baraka" nine years later.

Stanley Kubrick's Boxes (2008) on Sundance Channel for the first time. I'd read online Jon Ronson's account of being invited to sift through hundreds of boxes in which the late Kubrick had stored practically everything (from fan letters to abandoned film ideas) that came through his posh British state. I had no idea Ronson had turned his access to the Kubrick state into an hour-long documentary for UK TV (which he narrates and shoots) that yields few but fascinating peeks behind Kubrick's secluded lifestyle. The handful of minutes (out of many hours) of on-location footage of Stanley directing "Full Metal Jacket" were cool. But the director's obsession-to-a-fault with minutia (like looking at hundreds of doorway and prostitute room pictures for a couple of scenes in "Eyes Wide Shut") is as nuts, but ultimately harmless, as the Kubrick fans that Ronson tracks through their letters to the director for follow-ups (Vincent Tisley's '73 diatribe is particularly amusing). Kubrick's assistant of several decades, Tony Frewin, emerges as a sympathetic figure of sorts for having to put up with the director's peculiarities by keeping a stiff upper lip at the oddest of requests. This short documentary would make a great bonus feature in any future re-issues of any Kubrick movie not yet available in high-def ("Barry Lyndon," "Lolita," "Paths of Glory," etc.). Warner, are you listening?

James Cameron's Avatar: An IMAX 3D Experience (2009) for the first time. Caught this on the last IMAX showing in NYC the day before "Alice in Wonderland 3D" took over all the IMAX screens. My first 3D movie since I saw "Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare" in theaters back in '91 (I know! ;-)) and, along with the previews of coming 3D attractions, I can see how 3D has evolved beyond a gimmick. In "Avatar" the 3D effect is actually a useful immersion technique that a skilled filmmaker like Cameron yields like surgeon to evoke precise emotions from his audience. If I had watched it in two-dimensional regular film "Avatar" would have probably come across as the second-lengthiest and prettiest PlayStation 3 CG-rendered cutscene since "Metal Gear Solid 4." :D Throughout the flick I kept telling myself that these characters, settings, plots and ideas weren't the least bit original (everything from "Planet Earth" documentaries and "Smurfs" cartoons to "Final Fantasy"/"Zelda" videogames and Cameron's own "The Abyss" had already pilfered through this material) but I just didn't care. I felt every bullet/rocket fired into that giant tree pierce a piece of my soul (and in real life I couldn't care less about the environment). During the big battle between the mercenaries and Navi fighters I caught myself watching it all unfold with my mouth wide open. For the first time in ages I can honestly say that I experienced the elusive 'like a kid watching 'Star Wars' for the first time' feeling many moviegoers claim to have experienced that was foreign to me. Despite the mostly-bland acting (except for Stephen Lang's out-there chief and Sigourney Weaver kicking ass better than any 62-year old actress I've ever seen 8) ) and predictable beats in the too-familiar story this was one of the best movie-going experience of my life. While I don't see me going to more 3D movies in the future (the blockbusters that get the 3D treatment aren't my regular movie-viewing diet) "Avatar" is the first movie in which I can't separate the 3D experience from the totality of the package. Definitely not buying it on DVD or Blu-ray until the whole '3D in the home' standards thing get sorted out.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby stypee » Thu Mar 25, 2010 12:59 pm

Interview With The Vampire Blu-Ray - I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed this movie. Tom Cruise gives a surprisngly good performance. It's funny to see Anne Rice praise his performance when she totally pained him the moment she learned he was playing Lestat.

The Lost Boys: The Tribe Unrated Version - I don't know, strange sequel. Corey Feldman returns acting rather badly. Angus Sutherland is a rather strange actor (I think he was hired because his name looks could on the promotional materials), and there's a rather odd, almost incestiual relationship between brother and sister. I might have to give it another viewing. Don't know how I feel about it.

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (Cheese) Apple TV - I was goofing around the net and came across a really cool superman movie page. There's an entire link dedicated to the making of this strange mess. It's probably the sloppiest in the series. Fun to watch the bad special effects, especially during the infamous Moon sequence. You can actually see the black drapes in the background of the set and it's very easy to see the cables holding up Reeve as his flying around. It's a shame to see Reeve exit the series in such a dud of a film. I guess it's a guilty pleasure at best.

Spacehunter: Something, Something Apple TV - Um, yeah. This movie mezmorized me when I was a kid. I saw it in 3-D at a local now defunct theatre. I thought I'd revisit my childhood and rent this flick. I couldn't get passed the first 30 minutes, it's just awful. I had no idea Ivan Reitman produced it, There's also a cameo voice over of Harold Ramis in the begining. I think his name doesn't show up in the credits.

Trying to get ahold of a copy of Megaforce - A horrid piece of dreck directed by Hal Needham ("Canonbal" fame), it came out in 1982 the same day Star Trek II: Wraith of Kahn was released. I saw it quite a few times on video and it has yet to surface on any other format. It really is dreadful but I just have to see it again, at least once more!
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby hoytereden » Fri Mar 26, 2010 8:03 pm

The Glass Key-Why oh why isn't this, and The Blue Dahlia, out on DVD? I've recorded both of them from TCM but would love to see them get a proper release. I realize that standard DVDs, and more specifically Classic titles, are getting short changed but Come on! Alan Ladd was a major noir player and so far only This Gun For Hire is out there. :(
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby molly1216 » Sat Mar 27, 2010 6:13 pm

stypee wrote:Spacehunter: Something, Something Apple TV - Um, yeah. This movie mezmorized me when I was a kid. I saw it in 3-D at a local now defunct theatre. I thought I'd revisit my childhood and rent this flick. I couldn't get passed the first 30 minutes, it's just awful. I had no idea Ivan Reitman produced it, There's also a cameo voice over of Harold Ramis in the begining. I think his name doesn't show up in the credits.


Spacehunter Adventures in the Forbidden Zone. don't you trash a classic. I will do an emergency repair procedure number one on you.

Caught Moon....awesome speculative fiction. nicely done.
Kill Buljo Kill Bill parody and silliness from the folks who made Dead Snow I am always pleased to find International films that are better than what we are turning out.

other than that i am still stuck in tv on dvd land...
.New Tricks UK-TV unsuckage...comedy drama detective sadly only 2 seasons.
Pie in the Sky more BBC TV - foodie detective stuff. yumm makes me want to raise chickens
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby Bryan Pope » Sat Mar 27, 2010 8:43 pm

500 Days of Summer -- A chick flick that can appeal to both guys and girls, sort of like High Fidelity, Grosse Point Blank and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Different, surprising and delightful.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby mavrach » Sat Mar 27, 2010 9:16 pm

Halloween, the Rob Zombie version. Dare I say that I liked it? (ducks) I'd avoided this since it came out because I'd heard bad things, but after seeing a lot of positive fan feedback at a couple of autograph shows in the area, I gave in and tried it out. Of course the original is a classic, but I thought this version fleshed out and modernized the original story. The extra meat, though a bit disjointed, gave Myers a much greater motivation rather than just a killer. The original focused on mood and themes, whereas the remake went into the background more.

I want to compare this to The Hills Have Eyes original & remake. I'd always heard terrible things about that remake, but when I watched it I was fine with it. It just took the original and did different things with it. It's not necessary bad, almost complimentary to the originals.

To give a completely odd example, compare this all to the original Star Trek to the new movie. Watch the entire original series & movies and what can you tell me about each crew member? Kirk is the captain, risky, bold, etc., not much more. Bones is the doctor, angry, emotional, not much more. You know their actions but not where they came from. The Trek reboot is lauded for the background and the modernization of these stories while still being respectful to the originals.


It did have its flaws. Zombie seems known for having uncomfortable scenes of rednecks swearing at each other, which was how this started off. Malcolm McDowell was good as Loomis, but at times he was trying to hard to channel Donald Pleasance in a movie that was trying to be more serious. If I were a cop I certainly wouldn't take serious somebody who told me that "evil is here!"

And in any Halloween movie, did they ever explain how Meyers became invincible? Considering how much time they went into his background, you'd think this would have come up.



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+1. this is very interesting.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby Dunnyman » Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:03 pm

hoytereden wrote:The Glass Key-Why oh why isn't this, and The Blue Dahlia, out on DVD? I've recorded both of them from TCM but would love to see them get a proper release. I realize that standard DVDs, and more specifically Classic titles, are getting short changed but Come on! Veronica Lake was a major femme fatale hottie and so far only This Gun For Hire is out there. :(

Fixed.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby azul017 » Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:30 pm

She's Out of My League - Cute movie, a bit Apatow-esque but much more tamer and sweeter. Jay Baruchel has that geeky, normal guy vibe to him and Alice Eve is perfectly convincing as a beautiful, but normal girl who likes him for his personality and honesty. See it while you can in theaters, but if you don't, a very strong rental recommendation.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby HGervais » Sun Mar 28, 2010 10:27 pm

For All Mankind & Yojimbo both on Criterion blu-ray. For All Mankind is one of those movies that strikes a chord because of the subject matter. I just think it is remarkable that once Kennedy made the call in 1961 we made it to the moon 8 years later. You want to talk about the best of what this country has to offer, then look no further than the people who took the leap and got us to the moon. Truly the best of what this country is capable of. Yojimbo is still just all kinds of awesome and Mifune was just about the coolest mutha frakker the screen has ever seen. Yojimbo looks gorgeous and For All Mankind looks pretty amzing in spots. Wonders were done with the source material.
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Re: 'MARCH (Watching Thread) or DIE (Another Day)'

Postby hoytereden » Mon Mar 29, 2010 11:18 am

Dunnyman wrote:
hoytereden wrote:The Glass Key-Why oh why isn't this, and The Blue Dahlia, out on DVD? I've recorded both of them from TCM but would love to see them get a proper release. I realize that standard DVDs, and more specifically Classic titles, are getting short changed but Come on! Veronica Lake was a major femme fatale hottie and so far only This Gun For Hire is out there. :(

Fixed.

That too. :) She and Ladd were the Bogie and Bacall of Paramount.

Watched The Snake Pit on TCM- I can't imagine the impact this film had on audiences of the late '40s. A very powerful (still today) story of a married woman's mental breakown and being committed to a state run mental institution. The conditions and practices shown on screen raised public awareness and helped to create reform in these areas. Olivia de Havilland is outstanding in the lead role. She was Oscar nominated but lost to Jane Wyman.
"You can lead a horse to water but a pencil must be lead"-Stan Laurel
Moe-"Were you scared?" Larry-"No, just apprehensive." Moe-"Apprehensive, that's a pretty big word.What's it mean?" Larry-"That's scared with a college education!"
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hoytereden
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