National Film Registry

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National Film Registry

Postby Kenneth Morgan » Wed Dec 28, 2011 6:39 am

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Re: National Film Registry

Postby Jim_Thomas » Wed Dec 28, 2011 8:27 am

Forrest Gump is ridiculously overrated.
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Re: National Film Registry

Postby mavrach » Wed Dec 28, 2011 10:34 am

I don't see the point of this endeavor. They can only add 25 films per year, and now only have a total of 575? I have double that amount in my den. Surely they don't have a space issue?

There's a bit of a loose criteria: "“ 'culturally, historically or aesthetically' significant." Why limit that to only 25? They've got a load of obscure or classic titles that fit that, but newer stuff like Toy Story? Is that in danger of not being preserved? Shouldn't every single critically-acclaimed film be entered into this registry? Heck, they have the capacity to store every single movie ever made into their system. What's the point of this, storing all films in case society ends or something?

It's great to honor these movies, but in the end isn't this just another list?


Jim, I fully agree with you on Forrest Gump, but the sad fact is this movie is very culturally significant. For the casual film viewer this considered to be one of the best movies you can find.
+1. this is very interesting.
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Re: National Film Registry

Postby Kenneth Morgan » Wed Dec 28, 2011 10:37 am

Here's the actual list:

Films Selected to the 2011 National Film Registry

1.Allures (1961)
2.Bambi (1942)
3.The Big Heat (1953)
4.A Computer Animated Hand (1972)
5.Crisis: Behind A Presidential Commitment (1963)
6.The Cry of the Children (1912)
7.A Cure for Pokeritis (1912)
8.El Mariachi (1992)
9.Faces (1968)
10.Fake Fruit Factory (1986)
11.Forrest Gump (1994)
12.Growing Up Female (1971)
13.Hester Street (1975)
14.I, an Actress (1977)
15.The Iron Horse (1924)
16.The Kid (1921)
17.The Lost Weekend (1945)
18.The Negro Soldier (1944)
19.Nicholas Brothers Family Home Movies (1930s-40s)
20.Norma Rae (1979)
21.Porgy and Bess (1959)
22.The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
23.Stand and Deliver (1988)
24.Twentieth Century (1934)
25.War of the Worlds (1953)

I can't really comment on about half of the list, since I've never seen them (for example, "Porgy & Bess" has been stuck in the vaults for a long time) and, in a few instances, I'd never even heard of them (what's "A Cure for Pokeritis"?). I am a bit surprised that "Forrest Gump" is getting the most press, well over "Bambi" or "Silence of the Lambs", perhaps the two other best-remembered movies on the list. It would be nice if this inspired renewed interest in some of these movies, but I'm not so sure it will.

I'm still waiting for "You Nazty Spy" to finally get selected.
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Re: National Film Registry

Postby Steve T Power » Wed Dec 28, 2011 10:49 am

El Mariachi??? Really???

Outside of being "competent" for a budget of 7 grand in early 1990's money, there's not a damn thing relevant or culturally significant there. Hell, It's not even a GOOD movie.
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Re: National Film Registry

Postby Kenneth Morgan » Wed Dec 28, 2011 12:19 pm

Steve T Power wrote:El Mariachi??? Really???

Outside of being "competent" for a budget of 7 grand in early 1990's money, there's not a damn thing relevant or culturally significant there. Hell, It's not even a GOOD movie.


The official explanation, from the Library of Congress website:

El Mariachi (1992)
Directed, edited, co-produced, and written in two weeks by Robert Rodriguez for $7,000 while a film student at the University of Texas, "El Mariachi" proved a favorite on the film festival circuit. After Columbia Pictures picked it up for distribution, the film helped usher in the independent movie boom of the early 1990s. "El Mariachi" is an energetic, highly entertaining tale of an itinerant musician, portrayed by co-producer and Rodriguez crony Carlos Gallardo, who arrives at a Mexican border town during a drug war and is mistaken for a hit man who recently escaped from prison. The story, as film historian Charles Ramirez Berg has suggested, plays with expectations common to two popular exploitation genres—the narcotraficante film, a Mexican police genre, and the transnational warrior-action film, itself rooted in Hollywood Westerns. Rodriguez’s success derived from invigorating these genres with creative variants despite the constraints of a shoestring budget. Rodriguez has gone on to direct films for major studios, becoming, in Berg’s estimation, "arguably the most successful Latino director ever to work in Hollywood."


Take from this what you will. Didn't see the movie, myself.
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Re: National Film Registry

Postby mavrach » Wed Dec 28, 2011 12:41 pm

Another reason this is interesting, the OR in 'culturally, historically or aesthetically' significant." Shrek is culturally significant, as would be many successful movies that aren't so hot critically.

That's why I have a hard time grasping the whole idea of this.
+1. this is very interesting.
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Re: National Film Registry

Postby Steve T Power » Wed Dec 28, 2011 1:01 pm

Kenneth Morgan wrote:
Steve T Power wrote:El Mariachi??? Really???

Outside of being "competent" for a budget of 7 grand in early 1990's money, there's not a damn thing relevant or culturally significant there. Hell, It's not even a GOOD movie.


The official explanation, from the Library of Congress website:

El Mariachi (1992)
Directed, edited, co-produced, and written in two weeks by Robert Rodriguez for $7,000 while a film student at the University of Texas, "El Mariachi" proved a favorite on the film festival circuit. After Columbia Pictures picked it up for distribution, the film helped usher in the independent movie boom of the early 1990s. "El Mariachi" is an energetic, highly entertaining tale of an itinerant musician, portrayed by co-producer and Rodriguez crony Carlos Gallardo, who arrives at a Mexican border town during a drug war and is mistaken for a hit man who recently escaped from prison. The story, as film historian Charles Ramirez Berg has suggested, plays with expectations common to two popular exploitation genres—the narcotraficante film, a Mexican police genre, and the transnational warrior-action film, itself rooted in Hollywood Westerns. Rodriguez’s success derived from invigorating these genres with creative variants despite the constraints of a shoestring budget. Rodriguez has gone on to direct films for major studios, becoming, in Berg’s estimation, "arguably the most successful Latino director ever to work in Hollywood."


Take from this what you will. Didn't see the movie, myself.


One word I wouldn't use to describe it is "energetic". It moves like a garden slug. It shows great creativity and editing prowess for the amount it cost to make, but no more so than Sam Raimi's early efforts. The writing is turgid and amateurish, the acting blows, and the action is stiff.

Gotta agree with Mavrach on this one: This whole thing is a pointless exercise.
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Re: National Film Registry

Postby Bryan Pope » Wed Dec 28, 2011 2:29 pm

Jim_Thomas wrote:Forrest Gump is ridiculously overrated.

Several times in the past I've just about been ready to agree with a statement like that, but then I come across Forrest Gump on tv and find myself sucked into it once again. So I guess it's time I admit that, for me, the film is a ridiculously entertaining Hollywood blockbuster.
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