Criterion For March

The wonderful world of high-def

Criterion For March

Postby HGervais » Wed Dec 15, 2010 12:52 pm

Interesting month for Criterion. Topsy-Turvy is a movie made for high definition.

Eclipse 26: Silent Naruse*

Flunky, Work Hard
Mikio Naruse 1931
Mikio Naruse’s earliest film in circulation is a charming, breezy short about an impoverished insurance salesman, Okabe, who is desperate to sell a policy to a wealthy family, and his scrappy young son.
No Blood Relation
Mikio Naruse 1932
An actress returns to Tokyo after a successful stint in Hollywood to reclaim the daughter she abandoned years before—with the help of her gangster brother. Yet the child’s father, and especially her nurturing new stepmother, won’t give in to the mother’s demands so easily.
Apart from You
Mikio Naruse 1933
For Apart from You, Mikio Naruse turned his camera on the lives of working women. This gently devastating evocation of women’s limited options in Depression-era Japan was a critical breakthrough for the director.
Every-Night Dreams
Mikio Naruse 1933
A single mother works tirelessly as a Ginza bar hostess to ensure a better life for her young son in Naruse’s formally ravishing drama about the desperation of daily living.
Street Without End
Mikio Naruse 1934
Mikio Naruse’s final silent film is a gloriously rich portrait of a waitress, Sugiko, whose life, despite a host of male admirers and even some intrigued movie talent scouts, ends up taking a suffocatingly domestic turn after a wealthy businessman accidentally hits her with his car.

#330/Au revoir les enfants-Louis Malle
Au revoir les enfants tells a heartbreaking story of friendship and devastating loss concerning two boys living in Nazi-occupied France. At a provincial Catholic boarding school, the precocious youths enjoy true camaraderie—until a secret is revealed. Based on events from writer-director Malle’s own childhood, the film is a subtle, precisely observed tale of courage, cowardice, and tragic awakening

#339/Yi Yi-Edward Yang
The extraordinary, internationally embraced Yi Yi (A One and a Two . . .), directed by the late Taiwanese master Edward Yang, follows a middle-class family in Taipei over the course of one year, beginning with a wedding and ending with a funeral. Whether chronicling middle-age father NJ’s tentative flirtations with an old flame or precocious young son Yang-Yang’s attempts at capturing reality with his beloved camera, the filmmaker deftly imbues every gorgeous frame with a compassionate clarity. Warm, sprawling, and dazzling, this intimate epic is one of the undisputed masterworks of the new century.

#557/The Times of Harvey Milk-Robert Epstein
A true twentieth-century trailblazer, Harvey Milk was an outspoken human rights activist and the first openly gay U.S. politician elected to public office; even after his assassination, in 1978, he continues to inspire disenfranchised people around the world. The Oscar-winning The Times of Harvey Milk, directed by Robert Epstein and produced by Richard Schmiechen, was, like its subject, groundbreaking. One of the first feature documentaries to address gay life in America, it’s a work of advocacy itself, bringing Milk’s message of hope and equality to a wider audience. This exhilarating trove of archival footage and heartfelt interviews is as much a vivid portrait of a time and place (San Francisco’s historic Castro District in the seventies) as a testament to the legacy of a political visionary.

#558/Topsy-Turvy-Mike Leigh
The world of Gilbert and Sullivan comes to vivid life in this extraordinary dramatization of the staging of their legendary 1885 comic opera The Mikado from Mike Leigh. Jim Broadbent and Allan Corduner brilliantly inhabit the roles of the world-famous Victorian librettist and composer, respectively, who, along with their troupe of temperamental actors, must battle personal and professional demons while mounting this major production. A lushly produced epic about the harsh realities of creative expression, featuring bravura performances and Oscar-winning costume design and makeup, Topsy-Turvy is an unexpected period delight from one of contemporary cinema’s great artists.

#559/The Mikado-Victor Schertzinger
The legendary Gilbert and Sullivan troupe the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company joined forces with Hollywood for this 1939 Technicolor version of the fabled comic opera, the first complete work by the famed duo to be adapted for the screen, directed by musician and Oscar-nominated filmmaker Victor Schertzinger. The result is a lavish cinematic retelling of the British political satire set in exotic Japan, with such enduringly popular numbers as “A Wandering Minstrel I” and “Three Little Maids from School Are We,” and featuring performances by American singer Kenny Baker as well as a host of renowned D’Oyly Carte actors, including Martyn Green and Sydney Granville.

*Standard DVD release only.
"The most dementing of all modern sins: the inability to distinquish excellence from success."-David Hare
User avatar
HGervais
Judge
 
Posts: 4725
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 12:14 am
Location: Greater New Orleans

Re: Criterion For March

Postby cdouglas » Wed Dec 15, 2010 2:47 pm

Huh. Some interesting titles. I'll be picking up Topsy-Turvy, for sure. Haven't seen Yi-Yi or The Mikado; anybody have some thoughts on those two?
cdouglas
Judge
 
Posts: 957
Joined: Thu May 22, 2008 10:49 am

Re: Criterion For March

Postby HGervais » Wed Dec 15, 2010 4:33 pm

YI YI is defintely worth a gander. This production of Mikado is a mystery to me but the company performing it is widely considered the greatest G&S company ever.
"The most dementing of all modern sins: the inability to distinquish excellence from success."-David Hare
User avatar
HGervais
Judge
 
Posts: 4725
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 12:14 am
Location: Greater New Orleans

Re: Criterion For March

Postby Future Man » Sun Dec 19, 2010 4:19 am

The picture quality of the current, dvd version of Au Revoir is so filmlike, it's somehow hard for me to imagine the Blu-ray offering an improvement.
Future Man
County Attorney
 
Posts: 1884
Joined: Sat May 14, 2005 9:05 pm


Return to Blu-ray

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron