Case Number 20471

GUN (BLU-RAY)

Image Entertainment // 2010 // 82 Minutes // Rated R
Reviewed by Judge David Johnson // January 10th, 2011

The Charge

A city caught in the crossfire.

Opening Statement

If there is a generic crime movie starring a rapper and an over-the-hill star, then indubitably I will be receiving it to review. Gun is such a production, a sub-par actioner starring Curtis "Half-Dollar" Jackson and a sadly corpulent Val Kilmer.

Facts of the Case

Jackson plays Rich, an up-and-coming gunrunner looking to expand his small scale arms dealership and start slinging hardware to the scummiest of the scum. One day, a friend from long ago shows up and seems excited about the prospect of getting his crime on with Rich. His name is Angel (Kilmer) and Rich's crew is reluctant to trust him. When a gun deal goes bad and Angel stands up in the clutch, it appears the relationship is still strong and the two begin their violent takeover of the underground arms business, with the cops hot on their tail.

The Evidence

Sorry. I tried to make that synopsis sound spicy and interesting with words like "violent," "scum," and "hot on their trail," but the mediocrity of Gun is too much. The flick is as tasty as a day-old baguette. While not ignominious, this milquetoast enterprise renders itself instantly forgettable.

There are guns and bad guys and swearing and Danny Trejo and James Remar. There's also a twist that's about as far from stupefying as the end of a Full House episode (Spoiler: Michelle learns a lesson about sharing!)

The central plot point is Rich and Angel's relationship, with the ever-looming unease of Angel's loyalty. Is he really the scumbag that Rich proudly proclaims -- a criminal who secured the calcification of his soul with his eager gunfire -- or is there an underlying conflict that might toss a monkey wrench into Rich's dreams of a transcontinental gun-running empire?

On the other side is a relatively half-baked saga of cops doing what they can to nail Rich. James Remar plays the indefatigable investigator with his typical gravitas, but it was just difficult to connect with the forces of good and their zooming around, snarling, making empty threats, and the usual fun/pointless stuff the rank and file do to pad the runtime.

In the end, it's all about Rich and Angel. Is there some hanky-panky going on? Is one of them a mole? Who's got leverage on whom? And so forth. The reveal will not shock you.

Image has an okay Blu-ray, fronted by a serviceable 2.35:1, 1080p transfer. It's a washed-out treatment, but I figure that's more stylistic than anything; this is, after all, a "gritty crime tale," and that means gun-metal gray color tones all over the place. The DTS-HD 5.1 Master Audio mix is clean enough. No extras.

Closing Statement

Again it's not like your day's going to be wrecked if you sit down with Gun. I just doubt it will serve as a suitable replacement for the most mundane task, like washing the dishes or analyzing the inflamed sex pilus of a paramecium with an electron microscope.

The Verdict

Guilty of consuming 82 minutes without much point.

Review content copyright © 2011 David Johnson; Site layout and review format copyright © 1998 - 2014 HipClick Designs LLC

Scales of Justice
Video: 85
Audio: 90
Extras: 0
Acting: 70
Story: 60
Judgment: 64

Perp Profile
Studio: Image Entertainment
Video Formats:
* 2.35:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)

Audio Formats:
* DTS HD 5.1 Master Audio (English)

Subtitles:
* English (SDH)
* Spanish

Running Time: 82 Minutes
Release Year: 2010
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks
* None

Accomplices
* IMDb
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt1560954/combined