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Case Number 19490

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Elvis: 75th Birthday Collection

Love Me Tender
1956 // 89 Minutes // Not Rated
Flaming Star
1960 // 92 Minutes // Not Rated
Follow That Dream
1961 // 109 Minutes // Not Rated
Wild In The Country
1961 // 114 Minutes // Not Rated
Kid Galahad
1962 // 100 Minutes // Not Rated
Frankie And Johnny
1966 // 88 Minutes // Not Rated
Clambake
1967 // 99 Minutes // Not Rated
Released by Fox
Reviewed by Judge Adam Arseneau (Retired) // August 16th, 2010

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All Rise...

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Editor's Note

Our reviews of Clambake (published October 26th, 2001), Frankie And Johnny (1966) (published June 8th, 2001), Frankie And Johnny (1991) (published December 21st, 2001), Humphrey Bogart: The Essential Collection (published November 15th, 2010), Kid Galahad (published June 23rd, 2006), Love Me Tender (published March 30th, 2006), Love Me Tender (1956) (Blu-ray) (published August 12th, 2013), and Love Me Tender / Flaming Star / Wild In The Country (published September 5th, 2002) are also available.

The Charge

"Lights, camera…Elvis!"

Opening Statement

Released to coincide with the King's 75th birthday (which he spent in a retirement home fighting Egyptian zombies) comes Elvis: 75th Birthday Collection, a box set bundle of seven beloved Elvis films. Well, beloved if you're a fan of the Man from Memphis. Otherwise, these films are…kind of goofy.

Facts of the Case

Elvis: 75th Birthday Collection contains seven Elvis films on seven DVDs:

• Clambake (1967)
A million-dollar heir (Elvis) wants to learn about life from the other side of the economic fence, so he trades identities with a penniless water-ski instructor. Without any money or a title, he has to rely on his charm to win the affection of a beautiful co-ed (Shelley Fabares) from the hands of a rich playboy (Bill Bixby).

• Flaming Star (1960)
Born to a Kiowa mother and a white Texas rancher father, Pacer Burton (Elvis) finds himself torn between two worlds as violence breaks out between the Kiowa tribe and the ranchers. Pacer tries to negotiate the peace and stay neutral, but soon finds himself drawn into the fight.

• Follow That Dream (1961)
Toby (Elvis) and his family, vagabonds heading to Florida, are just looking for a good time. Running out of gas, they take residence on the side of the road, but calamity ensues after the government declares the family squatters. They soon find themselves pursued by hoods and a vengeful social worker.

• Frankie and Johnny (1966)
Johnny (Elvis) is a riverboat entertainer with a string of endless bad luck, until he meets a beautiful redhead who just might be his ticket to riches. Frankie (Donna Douglas) doesn't take kindly to a girl infringing on her man, and schemes to win him back!

• Kid Galahad (1962)
Walter (Elvis) is a young and talented boxer with a gallant spirit. He meets a gambler (Gig Young) who promises to make him famous, and soon everyone is speaking the name of "Kid Galahad." When Walter realizes his partner may not have his best interests at heart, things get complicated.

• Love Me Tender (1956)
Vance Reno (Richard Egan) and his friends stole a Union payroll on behalf of the Confederacy, just as the Civil War ended. Now labeled a bandit and outlaw, he flees home, only to find out his family had assumed him dead, and his beloved girl married his younger brother (Elvis). Vance's return is a complicated affair for the family, a bittersweet happiness. Things complicate further when Vance suffers a crisis of faith and tries to return the money, against the wishes of his fellow partners-in-crime.

• Wild in the Country (1961)
Glenn Tyler (Elvis) is a rebellious teen with a soft intellectual side; he has a gift for the written word, despite a callous exterior. Labeled a delinquent, Glenn is sent to stay with his uncle under the care of a local psychiatrist (Hope Lange), but soon runs afoul of the local law.

The Evidence

A confession: an Elvis fan I'm not. After watching Elvis: 75th Birthday Collection I can now extend that to the King's cinematic endeavors. These seven films represent a nice cross section of Elvis' acting prowess; his highs and lows in the dramatic arts. Ironically, they're all pretty equal in mediocrity. To the legion of Elvis fans out there, all I can say is that the King was a musical prodigy, a groundbreaking artist who broke down barriers between segregated generations of music lovers, an innovator who arguably invented rock and roll. He was not, however, a particularly gifted actor. Odds are good, all you angry Elvis fans, that I'm not the first person to point this out.

At best, the films featured in Elvis: 75th Birthday Collection are kitsch genre films—lighthearted, simplistic Westerns and beach romps reworked from within to promote the star power of Elvis. If anyone else but Elvis were front and center in them, they would barely be remembered today, let alone endlessly re-issued and re-packaged on DVD. At their worst, these films are constructed and choreographed delivery devices for new Elvis songs, cinematic syringes injecting country ballads into the arm of a musically junked-out nation. For better or worse, his films remain surprisingly popular with fans.

Filmed way back in 1956, Love Me Tender was the first Elvis film, only featuring the King in a supporting role. Elvis shakes and dances in a wholly inappropriate fashion for a Civil War period piece, setting the tone for all future Elvis films to have his gyrating hips and songwriting prominently placed. Take Elvis out of the equation and you have an average film, not an outstanding drama or Western by any stretch, but not poisonous on the tongue. Richard Egan is sufficiently rugged and handsome as a leading man, while Debra Paget looks on longingly. Elvis' youthful exuberance and enthusiasm for his first acting gig are so enthusiastic as to distract from his inexperience in front of a camera. For better or worse, Love Me Tender does set the mold for future Elvis films to follow: co-opt an otherwise unremarkable studio release, throw Elvis into the mix singing and dancing, market to screaming girls the world over, and rake in the dollars. While you'd never call Love Me Tender a classic, it is a far cry from the train wrecks to come later in Elvis' film career.

Skip ahead a few years to 1960 and we see a more sophisticated and mature role for Elvis in Flaming Star, a rarity in his cinematic career. Elvis fought with Hollywood and his management for years over his desire to transform into a dramatic actor, but ticket sales would soon drive Elvis into the campy comedic beach romp formula that so dogged his career in years to come. Directed by Don Siegel (Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Dirty Harry), Flaming Star is a half-decent Western: solid direction, strong performances from its cast, plenty of angst and action and a reasonable effort to throw in complex racial relations, pitting Texas ranchers against native Kiowa tribes. Elvis is no Marlon Brando (the actor to whom the part was originally written for) but give credit where due—he holds his own here, turning out a competent performance as a half-Kiowa teenager torn between his two heritages. With only two musical tracks and no pelvic shaking, Flaming Star is a small glimpse into what could have been, a world in which Elvis could pursue a genuine acting career, not just projects custom tailored to suit his star power. Flaming Star feels like a movie with Elvis in it, not just an Elvis movie. There's a big difference.

Wild in the Country, shot in 1961 continues Elvis' exploration into dramatic acting, his last foray in this genre before being swept up by pressures from his handlers to rake in big bucks with campy musicals. A drama about a teenager framed as a troublemaker, it shows yet more glimmers of potential in the dark, handsome, and jaded leading man. Had he stuck with dramatic acting, one imagines he could have had quite the talent. Wild in the Country features a good performance by Elvis, but the film itself is too insubstantial to have much dramatic weight. It feels like a weird soap opera by way of Rebel Without A Cause, except the protagonist, Glenn Tyler (Elvis) isn't really a bad boy…he's got the heart of a poet. I think I just threw up a bit in my mouth. He does get to make out with three exceptionally beautiful women, which, in my mind, is kind of what Elvis always does, everywhere he goes. In all other regards, Wild in the Country is an unremarkable and forgettable drama.

In contrast, Follow That Dream is quite pleasant. A relaxed and down-to-earth comedy, this is Elvis at his most charming and effable, a good old Southern boy with a smile on his face and a song in his heart. Based on a novel by Richard P. Powell, 1962's Follow That Dream is a relatively unknown film in Elvis' canon, eclipsed by the mega-success of previous ventures like Blue Hawaii. In his career, this film is something of a turning point, a road marker on the path of decline. From this point on, his creative output begins to drag. Albums begin to disappoint in both sales and critical acclaim. Call it a transition period between the hopeful and enthusiastic Elvis looking for dramatic roles, and the sagging and jaded Elvis endlessly cast into musical comedies without a good script in sight. Follow That Dream hangs comfortably in the middle space between these two periods, like a hammock strung up between two trees, contently swaying in the breeze. Elvis is relaxed and pleasant, but there is nothing exceptional in the role for him to sink his teeth into. There are plenty of catchy songs, but nothing groundbreaking. This is a film with a marquee as large as the Hollywood sign, but only two letters: OK.

A remake of a 1937 film of the same name, Kid Galahad puts Elvis in the role of a singing boxer. This casting could generously be called "entertaining," but try as he might, Elvis is about as intimidating as a peanut butter and banana sandwich. Even without this unfortunate stretch of casting logic, Kid Galahad is an odd film. This is a dramatic and gritty boxing film trapped in the body of a lighthearted musical comedy; a freakish chimera too twisted and mangled to survive in the wild unaided. Director Phil Karlson hints at that urbane grit that all good boxing films strive to achieve, but in Kid Galahad, it ends up endlessly tempered by Elvis's very presence, like a fire doused with a bucket of water. I suspect Kid Galahad wanted to be a straight-up boxing film, but the star power of Elvis converted the film midway into a comedy. The end result is a confusing mix of goofiness and gallantry, almost like a spoof. Oh, and keep an eye out for a young Charles Bronson.

Jumping ahead a few years to Frankie and Johnny, and we find Elvis in a campy musical riverboat film. He looks bemused and bored, the epitome of an actor running down the clock in front of the camera until he gets his paycheck. This is not a great role, for him or anyone else, and you can see the displeasure in every frame. The plot is hackneyed and contrived, but these things happen when you base the plot of a film around the lyrics of a song. The romantic lead, Donna Douglas (The Beverly Hillbillies) does a fine enough job, but both her and Elvis turn out rather forgettable performances. Lighthearted and wholesome, this movie is kind of a bore, like a cardboard cutout of a romantic comedy without any substance. The best part of the film—and this is reaching—are some Dixieland-inspired numbers that are noticeably upbeat and entertaining. Alas, most of Elvis' musical contributions are weak ballads, which just drive the film's value lower. The ending is so mind-numbingly stupid and banal it almost has to be seen to be believed.

Finally, Clambake is a picture-perfect example of how horrendously bad Elvis' acting career progressed in the late sixties, and how low his cultural currency had become. In 1967, campy musicals staring a washed-up country rocker were hardly riveting the youth of America. They were far too busy having their brains exploded by a growing counterculture of anti-establishment and drugs. I mean, Jimi Hendrix was out in 1967, for heaven's sake. "Clambake," the Elvis Presley album just wasn't going to cut it for America's youth. Growing increasingly despondent with his acting career, which had become little more than a farcical and endless marketing campaign for his failing album sales, Clambake is the King at his roughest. He's overweight, sluggish, and lacking charisma—the exact opposite of what people love about Elvis. It doesn't help matters that the film itself is a wretched affair, an overly contrived and preposterous beach musical. On the plus side, if all you know Shelley Fabares from is her stint on Coach, be prepared for a pleasant shock. She's a knockout.

Elvis: 75th Birthday Collection is a compilation box set, so the seven films assembled here are double-dips, currently available for retail purchase in standalone form. Little has been done to amalgamate the eccentricities and formatting foibles, so each film has markedly different menu design, technical specs, etc. In short: new packaging, old discs. Some films are anamorphic, while others (Follow That Dream, Frankie and Johnny, Clambake) are not. For some bizarre reason, Follow That Dream is a flipper disc. Some have mono sound, others stereo, while others have surround. There is no rhyme or reason to the presentations, which make it very challenging to pass overall judgment on the box set from a technical perspective. Most of the films show their age, with noticeable grain and some occasional print damage, but nothing unpleasant or unacceptable in that regard. Ironically, the worst-looking in the bunch is the newest film (Clambake) and the best looking is the oldest (Love Me Tender). It would have been nice to see all these films receive the same kind of treatment, rather than just repackaging previous versions.

In terms of extras, the only disc that offers up any is Love Me Tender, and they're identical to the standalone release. We get a commentary track with longtime Elvis collaborator Jerry Schilling, some short featurettes ("Elvis Hits Hollywood," "The Colonel & The King," "Love Me Tender: The Birth & Boom of the Elvis Hit") as well a still gallery and some trailers. The other six discs offer up theatrical trailers and nothing else.

The Rebuttal Witnesses

Admittedly, it is cool that as a society we have all these Elvis films floating out in the ether. Sure, his films may not be critically acclaimed, but they did cement Elvis in the public eye throughout the late 1950s and '60s, leading up to his first comeback. As a leading man, or even just a secondary character, Elvis is a fascinating figure on the screen; his charismatic playfulness, energy, and sparkle all translate with vibrancy to audiences. His acting prowess is mediocre at best, but even at his lowest ebb, his most laconic and disaffected, we can still see that twinkle in his eye that made the man a star.

Closing Statement

A chronological cash-in, Elvis: 75th Birthday Collection represents good value if (for some reason) you are an Elvis fan who doesn't already own these seven films. Methinks, for most fans of the King, this will just end up being just another double-dip.

The Verdict

Send him back to the retirement home with JFK. Let the man rest.

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Genres

• Classic
• Comedy
• Concerts and Musicals
• Drama
• Western

Scales of Justice, Love Me Tender

Video: 80
Audio: 74
Extras: 50
Acting: 74
Story: 72
Judgment: 74

Perp Profile, Love Me Tender

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (Spanish)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (English)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 89 Minutes
Release Year: 1956
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Love Me Tender

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Photo Gallery
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Flaming Star

Video: 76
Audio: 75
Extras: 5
Acting: 80
Story: 77
Judgment: 78

Perp Profile, Flaming Star

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 92 Minutes
Release Year: 1960
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Flaming Star

• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Follow That Dream

Video: 73
Audio: 74
Extras: 5
Acting: 75
Story: 74
Judgment: 74

Perp Profile, Follow That Dream

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Non-Anamorphic
• Full Frame
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 109 Minutes
Release Year: 1961
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Follow That Dream

• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Wild In The Country

Video: 74
Audio: 74
Extras: 5
Acting: 78
Story: 76
Judgment: 73

Perp Profile, Wild In The Country

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 114 Minutes
Release Year: 1961
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Wild In The Country

• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Kid Galahad

Video: 74
Audio: 75
Extras: 5
Acting: 74
Story: 77
Judgment: 72

Perp Profile, Kid Galahad

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (English)
Subtitles:
• English
• French
Running Time: 100 Minutes
Release Year: 1962
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Kid Galahad

• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Frankie And Johnny

Video: 73
Audio: 75
Extras: 5
Acting: 65
Story: 65
Judgment: 65

Perp Profile, Frankie And Johnny

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 1.66:1 Non-Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (French)
Subtitles:
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 88 Minutes
Release Year: 1966
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Frankie And Johnny

• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Clambake

Video: 65
Audio: 70
Extras: 5
Acting: 50
Story: 50
Judgment: 55

Perp Profile, Clambake

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Non-Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 99 Minutes
Release Year: 1967
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Clambake

• Trailer








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