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Case Number 26273

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Friday the 13th: The Complete Collection (Blu-ray)

Friday The 13th
1980 // 95 Minutes // Rated R
Friday The 13th Part 2
1981 // 86 Minutes // Rated R
Friday The 13th Part 3
1982 // 95 Minutes // Rated R
Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter
1984 // 91 Minutes // Rated R
Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning
1985 // 92 Minutes // Rated R
Friday The 13th Part VI: Jason Lives
1986 // 87 Minutes // Rated R
Friday The 13th Part VII: The New Blood
1988 // 88 Minutes // Rated R
Friday The 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan
1989 // 100 Minutes // Rated R
Jason Goes To Hell: The Final Friday
1993 // 88 Minutes // Rated R
Jason X
2001 // 92 Minutes // Rated R
Freddy Vs. Jason
2003 // 97 Minutes // Rated R
Friday The 13th (2009)
2009 // 97 Minutes // Rated R
Released by Warner Bros.
Reviewed by Judge Patrick Naugle // September 16th, 2013

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All Rise...

Judge Patrick Naugle received a hockey mask and a shiny new machete for Christmas last year. Coincidence?

Editor's Note

Our reviews of Freddy Vs. Jason (published December 15th, 2003), Friday The 13th (published December 24th, 1999), Friday The 13th: Region 2 Edition (published August 13th, 2004), Friday The 13th Part 2 (published September 25th, 2000), Friday The 13th Part 3 (published October 31st, 2000), Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter (published October 27th, 2000), Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning (published September 25th, 2001), Friday The 13th Part VI: Jason Lives (published September 25th, 2001), Friday The 13th Part VII: The New Blood (published September 3rd, 2002), Friday The 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan (published September 3rd, 2002), Friday The 13th (2009): Killer Cut (published June 16th, 2009), Friday The 13th (Blu-Ray) (published February 3rd, 2009), Friday The 13th (2009) (Blu-Ray) (published June 22nd, 2009), Friday The 13th Part 2 (Blu-Ray) (published June 16th, 2009), Friday The 13th Part 2: Deluxe Edition (published February 3rd, 2009), Friday The 13th Part 3 3-D (Blu-Ray) (published June 16th, 2009), Friday The 13th Part 3 3-D: Deluxe Edition (published February 3rd, 2009), Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning: Deluxe Edition (published June 16th, 2009), Friday The 13th Part VI: Jason Lives: Deluxe Edition (published June 16th, 2009), Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter: Deluxe Edition (published June 16th, 2009), Friday The 13th: The Ultimate Collection (published October 13th, 2011), Friday The 13th: Deluxe Edition (published February 3rd, 2009), Jason Goes To Hell: The Final Friday (published October 16th, 2002), and Jason X (published November 26th, 2002) are also available.

The Charge

"I told the others. They didn't believe me. They're all doomed!"

Opening Statement

The wait is over! Fans of Jason and his mommy issues are going to be thrilled to see that Warner Bros. (via licensing through Paramount) is releasing every single Friday the 13th film in high definition! The massive 12 movie set, Friday the 13th: The Complete Collection (Blu-ray), has finally slashed its way onto consumer's shelves!

Facts of the Case

It's possible that, with no new Friday the 13th films on the horizon, we may have finally seen the last of Jason Voorhees, the hockey masked mad man whom slashed his way through hundreds of nubile teens during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. With ten official entries in the series, one mash-up, and one remake, these movies have just about exhausted any and all plot lines left for a misshapen mongoloid drowning victim who grew up to become a machete wielding super zombie. Jason started his existence in a summer camp, headed off to the big city of Manhattan, ended up shot into the vastness of outer space, terrorized the kids on Elm Street, and finally came full circle back to his home base, Camp Crystal Lake. It's been quite a bloody ride.

The Evidence

Here's a run down of each entry's history, and my brief take on each film…

Friday the 13th (1980)
The original Friday the 13th still works as a fun '80s throwback, even with its low budget limitations. Director/creator Sean S. Cunningham (Deep Star Six) has basically created a variation on Agatha Christie's whodunit Ten Little Indians; a group of young kids wander the dilapidated Crystal Lake campsite and are picked off, one by one, by a mysterious stranger (spoiler warning for those living under a rock: it's not Jason). The acting is rather tepid (yes, even a pre-fame Kevin Bacon isn't very good), Tom Savini's gore effects are weak (at least, by today's standards), and the "mystery killer" is never even hinted at until the final reel (another spoiler waning for those living under a rock: it's Jason's mommy), making it impossible to figure out who the murderer actually is. The highlight of the movie is daffy Betsy Palmer (Mr. Roberts) as Jason's protective matriarch, who knows this material needs a bit of craziness to work. Also of note is music composer Harry Manfredini (who would stay on for almost the entire series) and his chillingly iconic film score, including the classic "ki-ki-ki-ki, ma-ma-ma-ma" effect. Of course, Jason does make an appearance in the film's final moments as a rather cheap (and cheap looking) scare, but it's enough to set up the mythology and make horror fans squeal.

Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981)
Here we are introduced to a grown up Jason Voorhees, as one of the mutated hillbillies from The Hills Have Eyes. Wearing a bag over his noggin' and a pair of dirty overalls, Jason looks more like an illegal moonshiner than a psycho killer. The movie starts by dispatching the previous film's heroine, Alice (a thankless cameo by holdover Adrienne King), using a very sharp ice pick, then quickly moves into more counselors at Camp Crystal Lake getting mauled and mutilated in dark corners of the woods. The entire experience has a generic feel, no doubt due to the fact that countless slasher clones popped up during 1981. Spunky Amy Steel (April Fool's Day) makes a formidable foe, wearing dead Mrs. Vorhees' sweater—whose decapitated head rests on an altar—to keep Jason from hacking her into a million little pieces (and you thought your dating life was rough). It's a respectable entry in the series by Halloween H20's Steve Miner (who also helmed Part 3), if not overly memorable.

Friday the 13th Part 3 (1982)
Fans love the third film for two reasons—1) it was filmed in 3D during the format's immense early '80s revival, and 2) it's the film where Jason finally receives his trademark hockey mask. Aside of those milestones, Friday the 13th Part 3 doesn't do much to set itself apart from the pack. The 3D effects actually pull the viewer out of the story; when actors start throwing their wallets and yo-yos at the screen, it has the opposite effect of "excitement." The characters are all of the stock variety, except for a biker gang that (while threatening in 1982) is downright silly in 2014. Some of the kills are suitably icky and fun, even if the VFX are often sub par (a spear flying through the air on fishing wire just doesn't cut the mustard). This film is also where Jason leaves this mortal coil and begins his walk into the realm of the supernatural, which actually makes a far more interesting story than just a simpleminded redneck maniac. It's an entertaining follow up that amuses, sometimes unintentionally, and offers fans a new cinematic monstrosity, hockey mask and all.

Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter (1984)
In the pantheon of Friday the 13th films, The Final Chapter is often held in high regard, and it's pretty obvious why. Director Joseph Zito's (The Prowler) entry is lean and mean, giving Jason a decent curtain call…which would last all of a year. At the time, Paramount had meant for the fourth film to be the final installment, but fan reaction was so positive that Jason would rise once again. This one has a lot going for it, including the return of VFX master Tom Savini and his masterful creation; Jason's look and movements by stuntman Ted White are truly repellent. Also on board is a pre-Back to the Future Crispin Glover as one of the ill-fated teens (performing a dance that has to be seen to be believed), and a young Corey Feldman (The Goonies) as one of the franchise protagonists, Tommy Jarvis. The movie clips along without much dead space, bounding from one kill to the next with unbridled glee. The final moments—when Jason gets his obvious comeuppance care of a machete to the face—are an amazing melding of practical effects, stage blood, and razor sharp kitchen implements. As '80s "dead teenager" movies go (Roger Ebert's perfectly coined phrase), Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter is as close to perfection as we can get.

Friday the 13th Part V: A New Beginning (1985)
Disappointing doesn't begin to describe director Danny Steinmann's (Savage Streets) odd man out installment. Because audiences clamored for Jason's return, series producer Frank Mancuso Jr. decided to bring our favorite slasher back in the worst possible way…by not bringing him back. In one of the worst bait and switches in cinematic history, 1985's A New Beginning keeps Jason front and center until, in the final moments, it's revealed he isn't really Jason, but an impostor played by an inconsequential supporting character exacting revenge for the death of his son at a halfway house. It's a weird artistic choice that doesn't pay off, and fans of the franchise often rate this entry as one of the worst. Also running through the film is an undercurrent of sleaze; the production values feel cheaper and the nudity more bountiful (no surprise considering Steinmann's pornography background). John Shepard (Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius) takes on the role of protagonist Tommy Jarvis (a child in the previous movie, now magically a teenager) with an ineffective mix of glaring glances and silent rage. It's a good thing the series didn't end with this tepid entry, as Jason's final bow would have been non-existent.

Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives (1986)
Writer/director Tom McLoughlin (Date with an Angel) was given free reign to bring Jason back from the dead, and what better way to to do so than with a classic horror homage. With a nod to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Jason is jolted back to life with a metal fence post and a random bolt of lightning. Clearly, McLoughlin makes the immediate decision not to take Jason's return from the grave seriously, and the movie becomes wildly self-referential (think Scream-lite). Repeatedly winking at the audience (one character actually turns to the screen and quips, "Some people have a strange idea of entertainment"), this sixth film is a real hoot. Jason's zombified remains are no match for a screenplay that consistently makes fun of its own horror. Return of the Living Dead's Thom Matthews plays Tommy Jarvis (the character's final appearance) with dead seriousness and a real sense of purpose. Bathed in blues and blacks, McLoughlin gives his film a unique look that sets it apart from the others. Jason's return is most welcome, and with many memorable performances (David Kagen's sheriff shows a playful sense of humor), this is one of the best in the series.

Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)
Jason vs. Carrie would have been a more appropriate title for director John Carl Buechler's sequel. Originally planned as a vehicle to pit Jason against fellow horror icon Freddy Kruger (later rewritten when licensing talks between the studios fell apart), The New Blood earns points for trying to do something new with the series, however slight. Buechler's Jason (now played by Kane Hodder) is one of the best in the series; his monstrous madman is all gooey black skin and exposed backbone, a true terror in the woods. Unfortunately, by 1988 the MPAA had a grudge against the series and forced the director to make heavy cuts, neutering much of the grizzle and gore. Even so, this is solidly constructed sequel (my personal favorite), and the sense of mounting dread is maintained right until the final battle between Lar Park Lincoln's telekinetic Tina and the demonic Mr. Voorhees. There are some truly creative deaths scenes to be found here—the sleeping bag sequence is considered a real high point—and even a few of the characters come off as memorable, including Weekend at Bernie's Terry Kiser as Tina's shifty psychiatrist. Although Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood lacks the humor and winking of Jason Lives, it's still a slick sensation machine that gives fans a quintessential Jason in all his undead glory.

Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan (1989)
The pre-release posters for this eighth entry informed viewers that Jason would be leaving Camp Crystal Lake and heading to the Big Apple ("New York has a new problem"). The idea seemed novel and exciting, only to be squandered in its execution. Writer/director Rob Hedden's film actually takes place on a small ocean liner for 3/4 of the run time, then throws Jason into Times Square for about four minutes, finishing up in New York City's underground labyrinthine of sewer tunnels. Although fans often consider the film a real dog, I actually believe Jason Takes Manhattan to be one of the better entries in the series. Yes, we technically get screwed out of seeing Jason hack n' slash his way through Madison Square Garden, but what the film lacks in payoff it makes up for in fun aboard this cruise ship of the damned. Jason (Kane Hodder) stalks the teenage passengers one by one, giving the series a new and interesting arena for Jason to do his business, which turns out to be a load of cheesy fun.

Jason Goes To Hell: The Final Friday (1993) Speaking of movies fans love to hate, The Final Friday seems to top the list of sequels reviled by the franchise's core fan base. I can understand why: this one manages to dump the formula used well over a decade and turns the whole experience on its ear. After a pretty cool opening sequence (where Jason gets blown to smithereens by a military outfit), the script settles into a demonic body possession plot (ala The Hidden) that never really gels with the original mythology. Jason is absent for a good portion of the story, well…at least his familiar visage is, since Jason inhabits other people's bodies, which makes it feel like a completely different flick. Again, I have to give director Adam Marcus (Texas Chainsaw 3D), writer Dean Lorey (Arrested Development), and producer Sean S. Cunningham ("The creator of the first returns to being you the last") props for trying something new, even if it ultimately doesn't work. Some of the performances are fun—including the diminutive Leslie Jordan (Will and Grace) as a short order cook, and 21 Jump Street's Steven Williams as a kooky sadistic bounty hunter. Even though a few of Jason's kills are nearly off the chart in their grotesqueness (a scene where Jason tears a female camper in half mid-coitus is almost too brutal), being teased with the notion that Jason's "final" hour had arrived, this was clear case of false studio marketing.

Jason X (2001)
It would be eight long years before Jason Voorhees would make his return to the big screen. For a while it seemed that Jason Goes to Hell was right; maybe the masked madman was finally down for the count. Fans knew better though and while New Line continued to develop a screenplay to bring Jason and Freddy together, producer Sean S. Cunningham and writer Todd Farmer (Drive AngryHellraiser franchise had already attempted sending its main villain (Pinhead) into the cosmos with little success. Jason X advances the mythos into the future where Jason (once again played by the brutish Kane Hodder) is sent hurtling through space on a ship filled with horn, attractive teenagers (natch) who eventually meet the pointy end of Jason's machete (double natch). Truth be told, if you just go with the film's goofy set up, it's an amusing little thrill ride. True, the special effects aren't great (the model work is just this side of Syfy original movies), but the sequence where Jason gets upgraded into a bizarre uber-Jason cyborg is one of the high points of the entire series. Obviously, the acting isn't Oscar-worthy, but the inclusion of director David Cronenberg (The Fly) as a creepy government agent almost makes up for the rest of the community theater talent on screen. Though it floundered at the box office, Jason X remains one of the most goofy and entertaining films in the cannon.

Freddy vs. Jason (2003)
If they gave out awards for "most anticipated movie EVER," this would win hands down. The script's gestation went on for decades, teased in the final moments of Jason Goes to Hell with Freddy's glove dragging Jason's mask into Hell. When it finally did arrive in the summer in 2003, Freddy vs. Jason made an absolute killing (pun intended) at the box office, to the tune of over $80 million dollars. Little wonder why. Not since Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man have two iconic titans of terror duked it out on screen. International director Ronny Yu (Bride of Chucky) brings an overseas flair to the proceedings, especially during the climactic battle which features what I can only assume was a tanker truck full of fake movie blood. Though it feels a bit more geared towards Freddy's nightmare sensibilities than Jason's deep woods stalking, it's a real treat to see these two together. Robert Englund brings devilish flare to the role of Freddy, while newcomer Ken Kirzinger (replacing Kane Hodder, to many fans disapproval) plays Jason more sympathetic than in previous adventures. Of course, the cast features a bunch of bland teens (including Destiny's Child's Kelly Rowland and Ginger Snaps' Katharine Isabelle) whose job is to a) offer up exposition, or b) end up a mutilated victim. The human element aside—and really, who needs that in a movie like this?—this is really Jason and Freddy's show, all leading up to a battle royal that should satisfy fans of either franchise. This is by no means a perfect movie, but hey…at least New Line got the film made. Considering the project's sordid history, that seems like a small miracle in and of itself.

Friday the 13th (2009)
When Michael Bay (Transformers) and his production company unveiled a remake of Tobe Hooper's classic The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, I doubt they had any idea they were starting a trend in which every popular—and not-so-popular—horror movie received a big budget gritty reboot. Almost no franchise was left untouched, including Halloween, A Nightmare on Elm Street, and Evil Dead. Texas Chainsaw Massacre director Marcus Nispel was brought on to "re-imagine" Jason's mythology. Gone was any sense of silliness and fun, replaced by utter brutality and a Jason (played by stuntman Derek Mears) who made previous incarnations seem like true gentlemen in comparison. Not only do we get to learn why Jason can get around so fast (secret underground tunnels!), but we also get his backstory (a recap of the original film) crammed into ten minutes of exposition at the beginning of the film. After watching this tepid remake, I've come to the conclusion that maybe it's truly time to let Jason's legacy rest in piece. Though slickly constructed with high production values and tight editing, there's an emptiness that lingers over the film like a heavy fog. The characters are either forgettable or unlikable (see Supernatural's Jared Padalecki), and while there are some well-crafted scenes (the pre-title sequence is as tense as they come), this new version of Friday the 13th sinks under the weight of what's come before.

In the end, the franchise holds up, especially for those who consumed these films during our formative years. In truth, that may be all that keeps this series bobbing along; nostalgia for a simpler horror. Jason has become a true silver screen legend—even those who haven't seen any of these films recognize what the hockey mask represents—and his legacy lives on. His headless mama would be so proud.

Warner Bros. presents each film in 1.85:1/1080p HD widescreen, except for Friday the 13th Part 3, Freddy vs. Jason, and Friday the 13th (2009), which are show in their native 2.40:1. Not surprisingly, the older films tend to look rougher than the new films. Friday the 13th, Friday the 13th Part 2, and Friday the 13th Part 3 all are clearer than previous DVD releases, but retain a fair amount of film grain and imperfection. The Final Chapter and A New Beginning both look better than the previous three (although the fifth film looks surprisingly worse). By the time we get to Jason Lives, things start to pick up considerably, such that The New Blood, Jason Takes Manhattan, and Jason Goes to Hell, all look fairly sharp while still retaining a bit of softness. Jason X looks excellent with a sharp picture and deep black levels, and the final two films are near perfect, rounding out a very impressive collection.

Most films receive DTS-HD 5.1 Master Audio tracks, except for Friday the 13th, Friday the 13th Part 2, and Friday the 13th Part 3, Freddy vs. Jason, and Friday the 13th (2009), which are presented in TrueHD 5.1 Surround, all in English. Much like the video presentations, the audio for each gets progressively better as the series goes on. The first few films—while presented in 5.1—often have a mono feel (except when certain music cues or sound effects jump out through the speakers). Once the more recent films come into play (from Jason Goes to Hell onward), the tracks become much more aggressive. Though the earlier films aren't super exciting on your home theater system, they offer clearly recorded dialogue, music, and effects, which should make fans very happy.

Bonus features are all ported over from Paramount's previous DVD releases. The extra bonus disc is the same as the "From Crystal Lake to Manhattan" collection a few years back, which included a theatrical trailer for each, deleted scenes, "The Friday the 13th Chronicles" (which looks at each movie in small segments), and some featurettes ("Secrets Behind the Gore," "Crystal Lake Victims Tell All," "Friday Artifacts and Collectibles"). Each film contains the same bonus features found on Paramount's "Deluxe Editions," which includes commentary tracks, various making-of featurettes, deleted scenes, and trailers, but NOT a single bonus feature here was created exclusively for this Blu-ray set. That's a definite travesty, but given the miracle it took to get this entire series on Blu-ray to begin with, I can't complain. For a much more comprehensive look at the series, the four hour documentary Crystal Lake Memories: A Complete History of Friday the 13th) was released the same day as this Blu-ray set. The only extras the studio doles out with this set are a reduced version of Peter Bracke's Crystal Lake Memories book, a set of 3D glasses, and a nylon "Camp Crystal Lake" iron-on patch.

Closing Statement

Fans of the Friday the 13th franchise are going to be thrilled with this set. Kudos to Warner Bros. for picking up Paramount's dropped ball. This is probably the best all twelve films will ever look (until the inevitable Ultra 900K High Def 7800p Quantum-ray technology storms Best Buy), and with a price tag of $100 or less(not bad for twelve movies), it's an easy recommendation to make.

The Verdict

Ki-ki-ki-ki, Ma-ma-ma-ma…splat!

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Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th

Video: 80
Audio: 85
Extras: 85
Acting: 83
Story: 82
Judgment: 85

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• TrueHD 5.1 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 95 Minutes
Release Year: 1980
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th Part 2

Video: 84
Audio: 85
Extras: 85
Acting: 78
Story: 76
Judgment: 78

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th Part 2

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 2.40:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• TrueHD 5.1 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 86 Minutes
Release Year: 1981
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th Part 2

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th Part 3

Video: 79
Audio: 83
Extras: 86
Acting: 75
Story: 75
Judgment: 77

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th Part 3

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• DTS HD 5.1 Master Audio (English)
Subtitles:
• English (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 95 Minutes
Release Year: 1982
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th Part 3

• 2D Version
• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy
• 3D Glasses

Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter

Video: 85
Audio: 85
Extras: 85
Acting: 85
Story: 86
Judgment: 85

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• DTS HD 5.1 Master Audio (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (French)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 91 Minutes
Release Year: 1984
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Alternate Ending
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning

Video: 81
Audio: 83
Extras: 85
Acting: 72
Story: 65
Judgment: 69

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• DTS HD 5.1 Master Audio (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (French)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 92 Minutes
Release Year: 1985
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th Part VI: Jason Lives

Video: 86
Audio: 85
Extras: 87
Acting: 88
Story: 87
Judgment: 88

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th Part VI: Jason Lives

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• DTS HD 7.1 Master Audio (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (French)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 87 Minutes
Release Year: 1986
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th Part VI: Jason Lives

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th Part VII: The New Blood

Video: 87
Audio: 87
Extras: 86
Acting: 88
Story: 88
Judgment: 86

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th Part VII: The New Blood

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• DTS HD 5.1 Master Audio (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (French)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 88 Minutes
Release Year: 1988
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th Part VII: The New Blood

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan

Video: 89
Audio: 89
Extras: 86
Acting: 82
Story: 80
Judgment: 80

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• DTS HD 5.1 Master Audio (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (French)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• Bosnian/Serbo-Croatian (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 100 Minutes
Release Year: 1989
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Jason Goes To Hell: The Final Friday

Video: 90
Audio: 88
Extras: 82
Acting: 81
Story: 76
Judgment: 77

Perp Profile, Jason Goes To Hell: The Final Friday

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• DTS HD 5.1 Master Audio (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• Spanish
Running Time: 88 Minutes
Release Year: 1993
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Jason Goes To Hell: The Final Friday

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Jason X

Video: 91
Audio: 93
Extras: 89
Acting: 75
Story: 77
Judgment: 82

Perp Profile, Jason X

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• DTS HD 5.1 Master Audio (Bosnian/Serbo-Croatian)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• Spanish
Running Time: 92 Minutes
Release Year: 2001
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Jason X

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Freddy Vs. Jason

Video: 93
Audio: 95
Extras: 93
Acting: 85
Story: 85
Judgment: 85

Perp Profile, Freddy Vs. Jason

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 2.40:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• TrueHD 5.1 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround (English)
Subtitles:
• Spanish
Running Time: 97 Minutes
Release Year: 2003
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Freddy Vs. Jason

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Alternate Ending
• Trailer
• Digital Copy

Scales of Justice, Friday The 13th (2009)

Video: 97
Audio: 97
Extras: 92
Acting: 71
Story: 65
Judgment: 66

Perp Profile, Friday The 13th (2009)

Studio: Warner Bros.
Video Formats:
• 2.40:1 Non-Anamorphic (1080p)
Audio Formats:
• TrueHD 5.1 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround (French)
Subtitles:
• English (SDH)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 97 Minutes
Release Year: 2009
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Friday The 13th (2009)

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Deleted Scenes
• Trailer
• Digital Copy








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