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Case Number 10472

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Grey Gardens / The Beales Of Grey Gardens: Criterion Collection

Grey Gardens
1975 // 100 Minutes // Rated PG
The Beales Of Grey Gardens
2006 // 90 Minutes // Not Rated
Released by Criterion
Reviewed by Judge Bill Gibron // December 14th, 2006

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All Rise...

According to Judge Bill Gibron, film doesn't get anymore fascinating than this lively look at a couple of wealthy eccentrics and their decaying home in the Hamptons.

Editor's Note

Our reviews of Grey Gardens (published July 29th, 2009) and Grey Gardens: Criterion Collection (published April 2nd, 2002) are also available.

The Charge

"It's very difficult to keep the line between the past and the present. You know what I mean? It's awfully difficult."
—Little Edie Bouvier Beale

Opening Statement

There is a fine line between insanity and eccentricity. There is also an even slimmer margin between desperation and dementia. Sometimes it's hard to decipher between the various mental fallacies. Some people use idiosyncrasy as a way of coping. Others allow their craziness to create endearing individualistic personas. After you factor in such adjunct issues as wealth, health, status, and situation, it becomes clear that even the nuttiest of individuals can avoid the stigma of psychosis by merely staying locked in their own insular place. It's what protected the Beales for almost 50 years. As relatives of the rich and famous, themselves both minor celebrities in their own singular right, the mother/daughter combo lived a reclusive, bubble-like existence in a tumbledown manor in the swankiest part of the Hamptons. With the standard domestic amenities always in question (they lived, for a time, without running water) and an evershifting menagerie of animals invading their space (cats, mice, raccoons, etc.), these one-time society stalwarts are now viewed as lamentable lunatics, adrift in an unhealthy home and an even more damaging familial dynamic.

Strangely enough, their quirky escapades would have been reserved for the back pages of the New York dailies had filmmaking brothers Albert and David Maysles not stumbled upon their story. Almost becoming a part of their weird world themselves, the documentarians recorded the gals, cinema vérité style, and came up with the masterful Grey Gardens. Now being re-released along with a sort-of sequel (The Beales of Grey Gardens), we get the rare opportunity to peek inside the world of privilege and see just how far down the money-fueled rabbit hole a pair of decrepit debutantes can actually fall.

Facts of the Case

While researching the life of Jacqueline Kennedy's sister, Lee Radziwill, award-winning documentary filmmakers Albert and David Maysles (Salesman, Gimme Shelter) stumbled upon a pair of unlikely potential subjects. One of Jackie-O's aunts, a defiant older woman named Edith Bouvier Beale, had recently had her home raided by health and human services officials who were worried that the septuagenarian, along with her nearly 60-year-old daughter Edie, were living in horribly unsanitary conditions. Required to clean up their Hamptons home, the duo claimed that local politics and a desire for their property was the cause of the personal persecution. But what the Maysles discovered once they contacted the Beales was startling to say the least. Holed up in a couple of rooms in their massive manor, cooking on hot plates and eating not much more than canned soup, ice cream, and simple salads, the pair were isolated, alone, and rebellious. Constantly bickering back and forth, sending each other mixed messages about their devotion and their disgust for one another, the Beales barely connected with the humanity outside their door. While they were aware of the events transpiring around the globe, they are too involved in their complicated companionship to care. The original owner of the estate called it Grey Gardens, a quasi-criticism on the locale's inability to sustain vibrant life. Apparently, the name applies to the interior as well as the exterior landscape.

The Evidence

It looks haunted. Even up close, the manor is draped in a heavy layer of age and decay. Windows appear broken out, shutters hang haphazardly from cracking sills, slats missing or misaligned. On all sides, stately homes gleam in the Hamptons sun, their rich inhabitants happy to polish their palaces to within an inch of their importance. It's opulence as reflected by real estate, status centered in a concept of curb appeal—but not for the Beales. These old-money matrons could care less about the upkeep on their estate. "Big" Edith is 75, and more than settled in her secluded life, thank you very much. Her spinster daughter, "Little" Edie, is rapidly approaching 60, and views the last few decades as mother's maligned helper as a premature prison sentence. Housekeeping is the last thing on their mind. As a matter of fact, if it weren't for government interference—and some latent familial charity—the pair would be practically homeless. But lineage won't allow these ladies to live in the lap of self-determined near-destitution. The surrounding kin—the famous Kennedy and Bouvier clans—have cash, and they make sure the Beales are well-endowed. But neither one really cares about the cash. For them, life has become a comical battle of wills, a mother vs. daughter dynamic that pits hopes against help, dreams against distraction. To call the Ediths hermetical would seem overly simplistic. They live in one great big wide world—it just happens to be of their own unusual creation.

Grey Gardens, the name of their rundown residence nestled back in between a series of sinister trees, also acts as the title for Albert and David Maysles' flawless documentary on the gals. It also reflects the status of the Beales as women, socialities and—in some ways—human beings. They are femme fatales whom life has let die, upper-crust crones who sit around half-dressed in a mansion festooned with peeling paint, rotting wood, and the feces of various animals. Their relationship is like a contest, a "who will blink first" face-off in which old wounds, new foibles, and lamented losses pile up as potential ammunition. For Big Edie, old age has robbed her of the two things she built her entire personality on—her looks and her career as a singer. While still in good voice, her body has completely broken down. She can barely walk, her eyes and legs failing simultaneously. Still she fancies herself a captivating catch and flirts shamelessly with Jerry, a young handyman who hangs around. Little Edie, on the other hand, has bigger personal fish to fry. Feeling hemmed in by her mother's constant demands and constantly threatening to move back to the big city, she understands implicitly that most of her dreams are unobtainable. Having given up any concept of a career decades before, and taken care of financially by a complex series of trusts and trade-offs, the aging beauty believes she's still fated for fame. Dressed in bizarre designs of her own making, shawls and scarves covering her seemingly bald head, Little Edie is a fatalistic fashion plate, a woman desperate to escape but unable to find the proper route out.

Together, in front of the Maysles' constant camera, these reckless and refined relatives square off, trading praise and poison back and forth like volleys in a country club tennis match. Little Edie will cheer her mother's rendition of "Tea for Two," then mimic and mock her recordings in the next catty breath. Big Edie will criticize her child's increasing weight while wondering aloud why her stunning singing voice never eclipsed her own. They will share simple memories and melt down over comments concerning the late, lost Mr. Beale. Men are a mitigated factor in Grey Gardens, Big Edie having shunned her spouse early on in their marriage, her two sons nowhere to be seen in and around the home (we do glimpse them, as babies, in some old photos). Even Jerry, the slightly slow hippie who seems to have moved in with the ladies, is seen as a cog to be used between the fighting females. Big Edie sees his attention as verification of her stunning sexuality. Little Edie views him as an interloper capable of stealing her antiques, precious books—and her place in Mother's heart. Indeed, the minor interaction we witness between the Beales and the rest of the world is presented as uneasy and unreal. A birthday party for Big Edie finds the guests sitting on newspapers (the chairs are dirty and haven't been cleaned in years) and drinking vintage wine out of Dixie Cups (the glassware having mysteriously disappeared long ago). Even the Maysles, who have become like ancillary family, face considerable limits, since they're not allowed by Little Edie to venture into other areas of the massive, 24-room home.

>From a pragmatic standpoint, it all seems so nutty. Though we slowly become aware that the implied wealth that comes with the Beale/Bouvier name is not as comforting as we assume (these women appear to be living right on the edge of abject poverty), their situation is obviously the result of a surreal self-fulfilling prophecy. By returning home without establishing her own identity, Little Edie was destined to fall under Big Edie's demonstrative domineering. All throughout Grey Gardens, the Maysles catch her scampering about and giggling like an arrested adolescent and, in essence, that is exactly what Edie is. Isolation has stunted her social skills to the point where, while refined and well turned-out, the younger Beale sounds like a lost and troubled teen. As she slinks around in scandalous, revealing clothes (so stylish that she actually inspired several famous fashion designers to copy her clever combinations) and bats her eyes at the camera, we see an aged youngster trapped in a wrinkling body. Big Edie is also ensnared by the past, but her feelings are very focused. She hates the fact that her marriage and child-rearing responsibilities misdirected her profession, and has apparently tried several times to jump-start her career (mostly by inviting men to live in Grey Gardens with her). For the meditative matron, fame flew away the minute she turned her back on what she really wanted. Now, with daughter Edie flaunting failure in her face on a rather consistent basis, Big Edie is bitter, a battleaxe ready to wield her own personal blade at anyone within range.

That Grey Gardens gives us all this via a non-intrusive, fly-on-the-wall perspective, says a great deal about the Beales' desire for attention. Though they claim to hate the interference of outsiders, they are more than happy to make room for the Maysles and the genial Jerry. In fact, as natural performers, the pair is desperate for almost any audience. There is lots of singing and carrying on in this film, almost as if the filmmakers fancied they were making a musical. During uncomfortable quarrels or awkward personal insights, one of the Beales will break out into song, stifling the moment with a melodious mist. Frequently, when confronted in lies or contradictions, Little Edie will just caterwaul away, keening in a juvenile, off-key manner that makes her mother furious. It could all be part of a battle plan made up of disappointment and deflection, but one senses something consistent here. Like a perplexing puzzle made up of heartaches and histrionics, Little Edie annoys her parent to prove the old gal's feelings—she can't live without the child. Similarly, Big Edie criticizes her only daughter as a way of keeping her practical and present. This is necessary since, throughout Grey Gardens, we see how easily disconnected the wayward woman can become. Perhaps the best example of an inaction film ever fashioned, neither resident of this rotting façade wants to leave. They may clamor for greener pastures or broader personal horizons, but there is something queerly comforting about their seemingly haunted home. Within its walls, a kind of truce has been forged, a peace between ladies who would rather suffer than live alone. It's what makes Grey Gardens such a stunning documentary. It's also what makes the Beales' legacy live on long after they finally found their eternal peace.

Interesting enough, Grey Gardens is a fairly balanced presentation. Both Edies get their moments, and when one or the other occupies the screen solely, the other is not far behind—either physically or spiritually. For the 2006 sequel, Albert Maysles, the remaining living member of the filmmaking brotherhood, decided to unearth as much footage as he could from the hours the pair spent in the disintegrating home. Oddly enough, it seems that Little Edie got the shortest end of the original's editing stick. Much of the new material in The Beales of Grey Gardens centers on her, her tendency toward awkward musical moments, and those oddball sequences where she reads from a well-worn horoscope paperback and tries to make sense of her life. In an introduction to the film, Albert hints that the reason most of these scenes were excised was because they show how intertwined the brothers were in the Beales' life. Edie obviously fancied David, and spent untold screen time commenting on their future together. Similarly, the filmmakers didn't like to prompt their participants, and all through the update, we hear them asking questions in hopes of spurring some interesting exchanges. This is more of a supplement than a true sequel (Grey Gardens maintains a sort of implied narrative while The Beales is more like a collection of outtakes), but anyone who believes that more of the Edies is an entertainment windfall will thoroughly enjoy this companion piece. While it lacks some of the original's psychological insight, the Edies remain fascinating, factual entities.

With a previous review of this title by the talented Dr. Michael Pinsky here at DVD Verdict, it seems pointless to delve deeply into the overall tech specs of this release. Criterion, new logo in place, claims that this is a new digital remastering of the film, but as an owner of the original presentation, there is really no discernible difference between the two. The film still looks excellent in its 1.33:1 full-screen transfer, with only occasional grain and age issues from the stock elements hampering the appearance. Similarly, the soundtrack is the same Dolby Digital Mono—flat and tinny but perfectly acceptable within the context of this kind of film. If you consider the sequel a full-blown bonus (it can also be bought separately, at least from what this critic can tell), then the second most-essential added extra is a full-length audio commentary by Albert Maysles, Ellen Hovde, and Muffie Meyer, and associate producer Susan Froemke. Formal, insightful, and loaded with backstage intrigue, this is the kind of critical context Criterion is famous for. Similarly, we get to hear Edie defend herself in a 1976 audio interview. She's still a pistol, loaded with conspiracy theories and odd insights. Add in the pictures, the essays, and the original trailers, and you've got a delightful digital package, one poised to perfectly complement the main movie featured.

Closing Statement

It seems odd that, for two people fiction could not possibly create, mediums other than the documentary have embraced and are interpreting the baffling Beales story. An off-Broadway musical (which recently shifted to the Great White Way itself) and a full-length feature film (with Drew Barrymore and Jessica Lange attached) are set to keep the ladies' story alive for future fans to discover. Yet no matter how good (or bad) these versions eventually are, nothing can compare to that first fleeting moment when we see the vine-covered Hamptons home, wood cracking as uncontrolled vegetation hides it from view. Suddenly, from out of the darkened back doorway, a decidedly older lady, her head wrapped in a telling turban, announces the situation for the day. "Mother's complaining about something," she winks, before flitting off like a preoccupied pixie lost in her daily designs. As an illustration to what makes Grey Gardens so special, such a sequence seems less than auspicious. But once we learn that this is just the icing on an unusually dense and deliciously cloistered cake, the anticipation for another slice becomes unbearable. It is easy to see why, as symbols or kitschy cult icons, Big and Little Edie Beale have endured. Something about them is so timeless, so vibrant and vulnerable, that they have no choice but to enter the realm of myth. Even though it has long been sold and re-modeled to modern specification, Grey Gardens will always be a dark, desolate place. Luckily, the ladies who once lived there lit it up quite well.

The Verdict

It's a masterpiece, sayeth the Court. Grey Gardens, its super sequel and Criterion are all found not guilty and are free to go.

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Genre

• Documentary

Scales of Justice, Grey Gardens

Video: 90
Audio: 85
Extras: 90
Story: 100
Judgment: 99

Perp Profile, Grey Gardens

Studio: Criterion
Video Formats:
• Full Frame
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
Subtitles:
• English
Running Time: 100 Minutes
Release Year: 1975
MPAA Rating: Rated PG

Distinguishing Marks, Grey Gardens

• Audio Commentary by Filmmakers Albert Maysles, Ellen Hovde, Muffie Meyer, and Susan Froemke
• Excerpts from a Recorded Interview with Little Edie Beale by Kathryn G. Graham for Interview Magazine (1976)
• Video Interviews with Fashion Designers Todd Oldham and John Bartlett
• Behind-the-Scenes Photographs
• Trailers
• Filmographies

Scales of Justice, The Beales Of Grey Gardens

Video: 90
Audio: 85
Extras: 90
Story: 100
Judgment: 99

Perp Profile, The Beales Of Grey Gardens

Studio: Criterion
Video Formats:
• Full Frame
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
Subtitles:
• English
Running Time: 90 Minutes
Release Year: 2006
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, The Beales Of Grey Gardens

• None








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