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Case Number 17465: Small Claims Court

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Paul Newman: The Tribute Collection

The Long, Hot Summer
1958 // 115 Minutes // Not Rated
Rally 'Round The Flag, Boys!
1958 // 106 Minutes // Not Rated
Exodus
1960 // 208 Minutes // Not Rated
From The Terrace
1960 // 144 Minutes // Not Rated
The Hustler
1961 // 135 Minutes // Not Rated
Hemingway's Adventures Of A Young Man
1962 // 145 Minutes // Not Rated
What A Way To Go!
1964 // 111 Minutes // Not Rated
Hombre
1967 // 111 Minutes // Not Rated
Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid
1969 // 110 Minutes // Rated PG
The Towering Inferno
1974 // 168 Minutes // Rated PG
Buffalo Bill And The Indians, Or Sitting Bull's History Lesson
1976 // 123 Minutes // Rated PG
Quintet
1979 // 119 Minutes // Rated R
The Verdict
1982 // 129 Minutes // Rated R
Released by MGM
Reviewed by Judge Clark Douglas // October 12th, 2009

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All Rise...

Judge Clark Douglas has got vision, and the rest of the world wears bifocals.

Editor's Note

Our reviews of Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (Blu-Ray) (published June 6th, 2008), Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid: Two-Disc Collector's Edition (published June 5th, 2006), From The Terrace (published May 29th, 2003), Hombre (published July 25th, 2002), The Hustler (Blu-ray) DigiBook (published June 6th, 2011), The Long, Hot Summer (published June 3rd, 2003), The Towering Inferno (published October 12th, 2000), The Towering Inferno (Blu-Ray) (published August 6th, 2009), The Verdict (Blu-ray) (published May 23rd, 2013), and The Verdict (Collector's Edition) (published June 12th, 2007) are also available.

The Charge

His looks were devastating. His charm was legendary. His legacy is astonishing.

The Case

The blurb on the box (seen above) tells no lies. They say you can't have it all, but if anyone did it was Paul Newman. He was a bona fide movie star and one of the best-looking actors in Hollywood during his younger years. He was also a daring, critically-regarded actor, unafraid of taking risks on films that other stars of his caliber didn't touch. When he grew too old to play standard leading man roles, he adapted and successfully re-defined himself. His marriage to Joanne Woodward was one those too-rare successful marriages in the entertainment industry, spanning a period of 50 years. He was known for his charity work, contributing a great deal to those less fortunate throughout his entire life. This box set collects 13 of Newman's MGM/Fox films, taking a good look at the actor's career from the time he reached true stardom (with The Long, Hot Summer in 1958) to the moment of his transformation as a new actor (The Verdict in 1982).

The contents of the set are contained in a sturdy cardboard case. The case contains a 136-page book offering behind-the-scenes photos and a few pages of info on each film included in the set. In addition, the 17 discs included in Paul Newman: The Tribute Collection are divided into two separate fold-out cardboard packages. The discs are contained in shallow slits spread throughout the fold-out cases, which is a rather unfortunate packaging situation. First, the set-up will undoubtedly cause some disc scuffing and scratching over time. Second, the discs slip out of place very easily (I had this happen numerous times over the course of reviewing this collection). These concerns aside, it's an attractive package that will look nice on your shelf (assuming you can find a place for the hefty rectangular box).

If the packaging is somewhat less than Grade A work, it should be noted that the price is adjusted suitably. Most online retailers are selling the collection for less than 70 bucks, coming out to roughly 5 dollars per film. So, the real question is whether or not there are enough quality films in the set to make a purchase worthwhile. We'll take them one-by-one, but permit me to make a couple of notes before we begin. First, it should be noted that despite the fact that each disc seems to be a brand-new printing, the supplemental contents and transfers are precisely the same as those found on the previously released DVD versions of these films. That means you get the excellent, recently remastered version of The Hustler and the awful, non-anamorphic eyesore that is Exodus. So, I won't be focusing on the details of the audio and video unless there is something terribly important of note (such as the aforementioned Exodus transfer). Likewise, for the sake of keeping this only terribly long instead of unforgivably long, I will only be listing the supplements included rather than going into specific detail regarding them. Sound good? Okay then, let's get started.

The Long, Hot Summer
I've always been somewhat fond of The Long, Hot Summer, a slightly misguided William Faulkner adaptation that marks the first time Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward collaborated onscreen. Newman plays Ben Quick, a con man with a history of burning down barns in small towns. Yes, he's seemingly a serial arsonist, but the folks of Frenchman's Bend, Mississippi don't know that. Ben gets a job working for the powerful Will Varner (Orson Welles), the man who more or less owns the entire town. Varner thinks pretty highly of Ben, so he decides to thrust the hunky young man into a relationship with his daughter Clara (Woodward). The film is a fun southern soap that gets pretty ridiculous by act three, but it's a guilty pleasure for me. The role of Ben Quick is a rather bizarre and challenging one, but Newman tackles it with a steely gusto that very successfully demonstrates what a cool force he could be when given the right material. Orson Welles is gloriously hammy (and remarkably round) as the swaggering Will Varner and Woodward excels in the scenes she shares with Newman. Look out for good little supporting turns from Angela Lansbury and Lee Remick, too. Perhaps the film's greatest attribute is a sensational Alex North score, blending sultry dramatic writing with lusty jazz.

Special features include an "AMC Backstory" featurette and a "Fox Movietone News" clip.

Rally 'Round the Flag, Boys!
We see a much different side of Newman in Leo McCarey's silly romp Rally 'Round the Flag, Boys!, which demonstrates Newman's abilities as a comedian if failing to be a satisfactory experience overall. Newman plays Harry Bannerman, a man who has two children and is happily married to the quirky Grace (Joanne Woodward). However, town flirt Angela Hoffa (Joan Collins) has her eye on Harry and intends to steal him away. Meanwhile, the socially active Grace enlists her husband to help in an effort to stop some military officials (Gale Gordon and Jack Carson) from putting a top-secret facility in the middle of their lovely hometown. The film works as a fun romp for the first 45 minutes or so, particularly during the scenes Newman and Woodward share together. Their chemistry is terrific once again, though in a much different manner here than in The Long, Hot Summer. However, once the witty wordplay of the first act gives way to the big plot developments of the rest of the film, things slowly move from bad to worse. The complicated unromantic triangle between Newman, Woodward and Collins requires extreme stupidity on the part of all three characters, while the military plotline is horribly contrived. Everything culminates in a spectacularly bad finish which involves a chimpanzee, a spaceship accidentally being launched and a bunch of local thugs dressing up like Indians. What could have been a fun little outing is killed by its own wretched excess. Still, it's worth a look if only to see just how funny Woodward could be when given the opportunity.

Special features include an audio commentary on select scenes with film historian Aubrey Solomon, a restoration comparison, a photo gallery, interactive pressbook, advertising gallery and theatrical trailer.

From the Terrace
The third collaboration between Newman and Woodward was perhaps their most consistent, despite being notably less colorful than the previous two installments. Newman plays Alfred Eaton, a military officer returning home from World War II. Sadly, Alfred's father (Leon Ames) seems cold and distant while his mother (Myrna Loy) has descended into extreme alcoholism. Newman re-enters the business world, achieving great success on Wall Street and marrying a very respectable woman named Mary (Woodward). Alas, as time passes the business side of his life begins to consume him, causing his marriage to crumble. It's all very melodramatic stuff, playing like slightly stale Douglas Sirk. Still, the turbulent performances from Newman, Loy, Woodward, and the rest of the cast are involving in their own over-the-top manner. The film benefits from impeccable production design and a gloriously lush Elmer Bernstein score, but ultimately the story feels a bit flat. It's a credit to Newman that his tormented turn resonates despite the artifice of the overall production.

The only supplements are an old Fox Movietone News piece about Newman and a theatrical trailer.

Exodus
There may be worse films in this collection, but I'm not sure there's one as painfully dull as the bloated Exodus. It's a disappointment both for fans of Newman and fans of director Otto Preminger, both of whom seem to have lost their usual spark in this outing. Newman plays Ben Canaan, a Palestinian Jew attempting to liberate ex-European Jews by bringing them to Palestine in the hopes of setting up an Israeli Free State. The book included with this set notes that Ben Canaan was the most overtly heroic character Newman ever played, and that may be a large part of why the role just doesn't work. As demonstrated in this collection, Newman could play many different notes masterfully, but evidently straightforward, noble dramatic hero wasn't one of them. He seems stiff and bland in the part, though the writing certainly doesn't do him any favors. The sprawling length of the film (208 minutes) is by all means unjustified, as far too many moments waste time on melodramatic subplots attempting to make the story more accessible for the average moviegoer. The film was a big hit, which is remarkable considering the failure of so many other more intriguing films of this sort during the 1960s. As mentioned earlier, the film's scope cannot be fully appreciated due the terrible non-anamorphic transfer the film receives. Not only is the massive imagery not given enough space on your screen, but the picture just looks bad in almost every way. Scratches, flecks, and awful detail define what should be a visually marvelous experience. Equally bad: the terrific Ernest Gold score sounds pinched and distorted throughout.

There are no supplements included on the disc.

The Hustler
There are three true classics contained in this collection, and The Hustler is the first of them. What is there to say about this film that hasn't already been said? No, it isn't a movie about pool, despite the fact that there is indeed a lot of pool contained within the film. No, it isn't about con games, though there are plenty of con games contained within the film. It's a movie about human nature and a man's search for "character," that hard-to-define quality that is simultaneously elusive and essential. There's a moment early on, when the young Fast Eddie Felson (Newman) is beating the legendary pool player Minnesota Fats (Jackie Gleason). Eddie boasts that he's going to keep beating Fats until Fats calls it quits. "Stick with this one," the tough Bert (George C. Scott) says, "He's a loser." Sure enough, Eddie loses all of his money, and then is forced to spend a great deal of time attempting to work his way back into a rematch with Minnesota Fats. When the climactic moment arrives, we are not just watching a man attempting to win a pool tournament; we're watching a masterfully-constructed climax that is functioning on several levels. The performances deserve great praise, not only the cocky-yet-vulnerable Newman but also Jackie Gleason (doing a complete 180 from his comedy work), Piper Laurie (developed with far more complexity than we expect) and George C. Scott (demonstrating remarkable assurance in one of his early screen appearances). It's a great film and you're guaranteed to find it engaging even if you could care less about the game of pool.

This 2-disc set includes an audio commentary with Newman, film historian Jeff Young and film critic Richard Schickel, featurettes "Life in the Fast Lane: Fast Eddie Felson and the Search for Greatness," "Milestones in Cinema History: The Hustler," and "Swimming with Sharks: The Art of the Hustle," trick shot analysis of five different scenes in the film, a "How to Make the Shot" featurette on five different scenes, galleries and a theatrical trailer.

Hemingway's Adventures of a Young Man
This film is something of an oddity in this collection, as Newman is merely a bit player in a large ensemble cast. The central figure of the film is Nick Adams (Richard Beymer), a character Ernest Hemingway created as a semi-autobiographical lead in numerous short stories published during the '20s and '30s. The film groups a number of these short stories together to create a reasonably coherent whole, becoming a sprawling 145-minute coming-of-age story. Even so, there is a distinctly episodic feeling to the film, and some episodes work better than others. Critics of the era praised the opening portion of the film starring Arthur Kennedy and Jessica Tandy as Adams' parents, but seen today this much-lauded portion seems preposterous: Young Adams regards his father as a failure because his father doesn't have the guts to stand up to his domineering mother. The father agrees and commits suicide. Yeah, it plays as poorly as it sounds. Then Adams sets about traveling the world, meeting the likes of Ricardo Montalban, Dan Dailey, Eli Wallach and yes, Newman himself as a grizzled character named "The Battler." Disappointingly, the Newman sequence is brief and bland. Much of the film's second half (in which Adams goes to Europe) is actually pretty compelling, but it's too little, too late. At least the film is nice to look at, as the lush outdoor scenery is played up as frequently as possible (and it's all accompanied by a really lovely Franz Waxman score).

The special features include an audio commentary with film historians Patricia King Hanson and Frank Thompsons, featurettes "Remembering Ernest: A.E. Hotchner's Adventures with Hemingway," "Papa's Last Days," and "A.E. Hotchner and Paul Newman: A Legacy of Charity," a restoration comparison, theatrical trailer and stills gallery.

What a Way to Go!
Newman plays a supporting role again in the unusual Shirley McClaine vehicle What a Way to Go!, a rare comedy outing for director J. Lee Thompson (Cape Fear, The Guns of Navarone). McClaine plays Louisa May Foster, a woman who has a disastrous relationship history. Every time she marries a man, the marriage will go well for a while until the man ultimately succumbs to greed and meets an untimely and unexpected death as a result (for instance, one husband literally "works himself to death" in an attempt to make as much money as possible). The men are played by Newman, Dean Martin, Dick Van Dyke, Robert Mitchum, and Gene Kelly. Four of them die; one survives and gets to live happily ever after. No, I won't tell you which one, but I will tell you that this comedy is a slight disappointment considering the talent of the cast. There are three or four jokes that are repeated in some variation in each segment, so by the time the film's final act arrives it has become tired and predictable. McClaine is appealing in the lead role, though she spends much of her time reacting to the wild antics of the men in her lives. A very smooth, hilariously haughty Dean Martin and the just-plain-eccentric Newman fare the best, creating memorable characters that keep us laughing during most of their screen time. Van Dyke and Kelly are appealing, but they do tend to overplay their roles a bit much. As for Mitchum…hey, I love Robert Mitchum about as much as it is humanly possible to love an actor, but the man just seems incredibly uninterested in his role as a powerful tycoon. Ultimately, What a Way to Go! feels like slightly less than the sum of its parts.

There are no special features on the disc.

Hombre
In this Martin Ritt western based on an Elmore Leonard novel, Newman plays John "Hombre" Russell, a white man who was raised by Apache Indians. Russell has lived with the Indians all of his life, but one day learns that he has inherited a boarding house in town. Russell determines to sell the boarding house, but his time spent in "civilized" society pushes him into moments of interaction with folks like boarding house operator Jessie (Diane Cilento) and the suspicious Grimes (Richard Boone). Soon he finds himself onboard a stagecoach with several folks from town, the stagecoach is robbed, and…well, I won't spoil what happens from there. However, the plot isn't of particular importance, as it's a routine western template more or less derived from a variety of prior westerns (not least of all John Ford's Stagecoach). However, the film works. This is partially due to terrific performances from the entire cast (particularly Newman's stony turn in the lead role and Boone's fun performance as the film's villain), and partially due to the intriguing moral dilemmas that play a role during the film's second half. If you're a fan of the western genre, you've seen plenty of films like this one before, but when such films are executed as skillfully as Hombre it's hard to complain.

Supplements are limited to a stills gallery and a theatrical trailer.

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
The second truly great film of the collection is George Roy Hill's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, a western that teamed the well-regarded Newman with up-and-coming star Robert Redford and gave both actors one of the great films of their respective careers. The duo play a pair of bank robbers who finally rob the wrong train and find themselves being tracked by a ruthless posse. Desperate to break free, Butch and Sundance head to Bolivia. Alas, life doesn't get much easier despite their new surroundings. Directed with a melancholic sense of nostalgia and featuring two great actors at the peak of their powers, the film is an infectious experience that I really enjoyed getting a chance to revisit. Granted, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is very much an exercise in style. It plays like a postmodern American remake of a Greek tragedy directed by Truffaut…but what a depth of style and what a depth of feeling this exercise contains. More and more protagonists were turning up dead during the third acts of western films at the time, and so do the protagonists of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. However, what comes before that (appropriately unseen) moment is a romantic and affecting contrast to the ultra-gritty bleakness of the then-evolving western genre.

The 2-disc set includes two audio commentaries, the first featuring director George Roy Hill, documentarian Robert Hall Jr., lyricist Hal David, and cinematographer Conrad Hall, and the second featuring writer William Goldman. You also get the featurettes "All of What Follows is True: The Making of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "The Wild Bunch: The True Tale of Butch and Sundance," and "History Through the Lens," in addition to a documentary called "Outlaws Out of Time." Finally, you get interviews with various cast members, galleries and trailers.

The Towering Inferno
Irwin Allen's massive blockbuster about a 135-story building that catches on fire is probably the most blatantly commercial film of this set. Newman plays Doug Roberts, the architect responsible for designing the tallest building in the world. Alas, in an attempt to save money, contractor Roger Simmons (Richard Chamberlain) does shoddy wiring work, causing a series of fires to take place on the day of the building's grand opening. What follows is an intense, engaging action-adventure film that represents Allen at the peak of his powers as an entertainer. Newman isn't employed so much for his considerable acting ability as for his star power. The combined names of Paul Newman and Steve McQueen were guaranteed to put butts in seats, and they're joined by a star-studded supporting casts that includes William Holden, Faye Dunaway, Robert Vaughn, Robert Wagner, Jennifer Jones, O.J. Simpson, and even Fred Astaire (in a rather exceptional turn). The performances are all just fine, but acting takes a backseat to the action/suspense sequences that dominate the film. The Towering Inferno has dated a good deal since the time of its release (am I the only one who finds that John Williams score awfully cheesy?), but it remains an entertaining spectacle. So often these massively expensive action films are deservedly associated with stupidity, but this one actually does have a moderate amount of brains to accompany the special effects sequences.

The 2-disc set gives you an audio commentary with film historian F.X. Sweeney and selected scene commentary with special effects artist Mike Vezina and stunt coordinator Branko Racki. You also get the featurettes "Inside the Tower: We Remember," Innovating Tower: The SPFX of an Inferno," "The Art of Towering," "Irwin Allen: Great Producer," "Directing the Inferno," "Putting out Fire," "Running on Fire," "Still the World's Tallest Building," and "The Heart of Disaster: Stirling Silliphant." You also get an "AMC Backstory" featurette, loads of deleted scenes, archival interviews, storyboard-to-film comparisons, interactive articles, galleries and trailers.

Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull's History Lesson
Two of the most striking examples of Newman's status as an unpredictable wild card are his collaborations with director Robert Altman, both of which are included in this set. The first of these is the oddly-titled Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull's History Lesson, a satirical and curious take on a peculiar chapter in American history. By examining the actions and activities of Buffalo Bill (a rather good, surprisingly restrained performance from Newman) and the members of his colorful Wild West Show, Altman playfully ponders subjects such as fame, showbusiness, and the troubling manner in which American history was formed. It's a mess, but an entertaining and engaging mess at that. A few sequences stand out as genuinely exceptional, particularly a moment towards the end when Buffalo Bill has a chat with the ghost of Sitting Bull. It's a busy, crowded tale in the classic Altman tradition, with a colorful ensemble cast (including Harvey Keitel, Shelley Duvall, Geraldine Chapman, Burt Lancaster and others) talking over each other and creating an array of distinct characters. Even so, it ultimately seems a bit too lacking in focus to become something really exceptional. The worst part is the DVD transfer, which is perhaps the worst transfer of the set. It's another non-anamorphic outing, and boy is it painful to look out. Scratches, flecks, dirt, grime, color bleeding, horrible lack of detail…ugh.

Special features includes a featurette called "From the Prairie to the Palace" and a theatrical trailer.

Quintet
Now here's the real oddity of this collection. You know how every once in a while you come across a film that makes you say, "How on earth did this thing actually get made?" Quintet is one of those films. Despite the fact that it was made by a major director (Altman) and stars a very popular actor (Newman) supported by a classy European cast (Fernando Rey, Bibi Anderrson), it's simply not well-loved or well-remembered. Why? Maybe because the film is near-incomprehensible from both a visual and storytelling perspective at times. Maybe because the vast majority of the film features Paul Newman walking through icy buildings with an ominous look on his face. Maybe because this post-apocalyptic flick introduces a Children of Men-style glimmer of hope at the 30-minute mark and then smashes that hope at the 45-minute mark, leaving only hopeless desolation for the remainder of the film's running time. Things are so strange and different in the world Altman creates; even the remnants of a world that has been destroyed don't seem to resemble our own very much at all. Newman reminisces about the days when everyone on earth was categorized by numbers and color coding. Old town centers resemble new-age design concepts fused with computer technology, and there seems to be a desperate need to find seals. As I said, you have to take some pretty huge mental leaps. In the bonus featurette included on the disc, Altman wickedly hints that it might not even be our own planet…"I don't really know," he claims. At one point in the film, Newman sees a goose flying north…but why? There's not supposed to be anything to the north. Then comes this bit of musing, which sums up this film quite perfectly: "The goose…does he know where he's going, or is he just flying into the unknown?" Any which way you slice it, Quintet is cinematic food for thought, whether or not you like the taste. It's also notably different from most Altman efforts, so don't expect the usual if you're a fan of the director.

Special features include a featurette called "Developing the World of Quintet" and a theatrical trailer.

The Verdict
The set concludes with Sidney Lumet's The Verdict, another masterpiece that deserves to sit alongside the likes of The Hustler and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Newman plays Boston lawyer Frank Galvin, an alcoholic ambulance-chaser whose best days seem to be far behind him. One day, an open-and-shut medical malpractice case falls into Frank's lap. The easy thing to do would be to settle the case, pocket the cash, and keep drinking. However, after Frank actually meets one of the victims, he decides that more than a simple settlement is needed and determines to take the case to court. Critics were startled by Newman's performance upon the film's release. Suddenly the great movie star seemed old, tired and beaten down by life…and it all seemed very convincing, almost disturbingly so. Newman's work is tremendous, though it should be noted that Lumet and screenwriter David Mamet give him excellent, thoughtful material to work with. It succeeds as a courtroom drama and as an in-depth character study, and the film delivers heartbreaking moments of truth with considerable consistency. While I'm disappointed that this collection wasn't able to include any films from the final 20 years or so of Newman's career (Nobody's Fool or Road to Perdition, for instance), The Verdict represents the start of a new, equally compelling section of the great actor's resume.

The 2-disc set gives you an audio commentary with Lumet and Newman, the featurettes "Paul Newman: The Craft of Acting," "Sidney Lumet: The Craft of Directing," and "Cinema History: The Verdict," archival featurettes, galleries and trailers.

So, Paul Newman: The Tribute Collection offers a pretty even mix of great films, good films, intriguing misfires, and terrible experiences. I feel there's enough material of quality here to merit a recommendation, though the frustrating packaging and awful transfers on Exodus and Buffalo Bill and the Indians should certainly be taken into consideration. You're missing quite a few essential Newman films, but this set does indeed offer a respectable overview of a great actor's work.

The Verdict

Not guilty.

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Scales of Justice, The Long, Hot Summer

Judgment: 80

Perp Profile, The Long, Hot Summer

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 115 Minutes
Release Year: 1958
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, The Long, Hot Summer

• Featurette
• Archival Clip

Scales of Justice, Rally 'Round The Flag, Boys!

Judgment: 70

Perp Profile, Rally 'Round The Flag, Boys!

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 4.0 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 106 Minutes
Release Year: 1958
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Rally 'Round The Flag, Boys!

• Commentary
• Archival Footage
• Image Galleries
• Interactive Pressbook
• Restoration Comparison
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Exodus

Judgment: 65

Perp Profile, Exodus

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Non-Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 208 Minutes
Release Year: 1960
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Exodus

• None

Scales of Justice, From The Terrace

Judgment: 80

Perp Profile, From The Terrace

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 144 Minutes
Release Year: 1960
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, From The Terrace

• Archival Clip
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, The Hustler

Judgment: 95

Perp Profile, The Hustler

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 135 Minutes
Release Year: 1961
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, The Hustler

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Trick Shot Analysis
• Image Galleries
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Hemingway's Adventures Of A Young Man

Judgment: 74

Perp Profile, Hemingway's Adventures Of A Young Man

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 145 Minutes
Release Year: 1962
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Hemingway's Adventures Of A Young Man

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Restoration Comparison
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, What A Way To Go!

Judgment: 79

Perp Profile, What A Way To Go!

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 111 Minutes
Release Year: 1964
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, What A Way To Go!

• None

Scales of Justice, Hombre

Judgment: 85

Perp Profile, Hombre

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 111 Minutes
Release Year: 1967
MPAA Rating: Not Rated

Distinguishing Marks, Hombre

• Image Gallery
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid

Judgment: 95

Perp Profile, Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 110 Minutes
Release Year: 1969
MPAA Rating: Rated PG

Distinguishing Marks, Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid

• Commentaries
• Documentary
• Featurettes
• Interviews
• Image Galleries
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, The Towering Inferno

Judgment: 85

Perp Profile, The Towering Inferno

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 168 Minutes
Release Year: 1974
MPAA Rating: Rated PG

Distinguishing Marks, The Towering Inferno

• Commentaries
• Deleted Scenes
• Featurettes
• Interviews
• Storyboard Comparisons
• Image Galleries
• Articles
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Buffalo Bill And The Indians, Or Sitting Bull's History Lesson

Judgment: 75

Perp Profile, Buffalo Bill And The Indians, Or Sitting Bull's History Lesson

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Non-Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
Subtitles:
• English (CC)
• French
• Spanish
Running Time: 123 Minutes
Release Year: 1976
MPAA Rating: Rated PG

Distinguishing Marks, Buffalo Bill And The Indians, Or Sitting Bull's History Lesson

• Featurette
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, Quintet

Judgment: 80

Perp Profile, Quintet

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 119 Minutes
Release Year: 1979
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, Quintet

• Featurette
• Trailer

Scales of Justice, The Verdict

Judgment: 95

Perp Profile, The Verdict

Studio: MGM
Video Formats:
• 1.85:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• English (CC)
• Spanish
Running Time: 129 Minutes
Release Year: 1982
MPAA Rating: Rated R

Distinguishing Marks, The Verdict

• Commentary
• Featurettes
• Image Galleries
• Trailer








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