DVD Verdict
Home About News Blu-ray DVD Reviews Upcoming DVD Releases Contest Podcasts Forums Judges Contact  

Case Number 10622

Buy The Rodgers And Hammerstein Collection at Amazon

The Rodgers And Hammerstein Collection

State Fair
1945 // 100 Minutes // Rated G
Oklahoma!
1955 // 145 Minutes // Rated G
Carousel
1956 // 128 Minutes // Rated G
The King And I
1956 // 133 Minutes // Rated G
South Pacific
1958 // 171 Minutes // Rated G
State Fair
1962 // 118 Minutes // Rated G
The Sound Of Music
1965 // 174 Minutes // Rated G
Released by Fox
Reviewed by Judge Bill Gibron // January 15th, 2007

• View Judge Gibron's Dossier
• E-mail Judge Gibron
• Printer Friendly Review


Every purchase you make through these Amazon links supports DVD Verdict's reviewing efforts. Thank you!




 

All Rise...

Judge Bill Gibron has to admit it: this box set is second only to the smell of greasepaint and the roar of the crowd in capturing the joy of Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical legacy.

Editor's Note

Our reviews of Oklahoma! (published October 24th, 2003), Oklahoma!: 50th Anniversary Edition (published December 7th, 2005), Oklahoma! (Blu-ray) (published January 15th, 2013), The Sound Of Music (published August 31st, 2000), The Sound Of Music: 40th Anniversary Edition (published December 12th, 2005), The Sound Of Music (Blu-Ray) 45th Anniversary Edition (published November 29th, 2010), South Pacific (Blu-Ray) (published April 13th, 2009), South Pacific / Gypsy (published May 2nd, 2013), South Pacific In Concert From Carnegie Hall (published July 13th, 2006), and State Fair: 60th Anniversary Edition (published December 7th, 2005) are also available.

The Charge

Some enchanted evening…You will adore this DVD box set

Opening Statement

The musical still remains the most elusive post-millennial art form. Neither the overdone Dreamgirls nor the self-congratulatory Chicago really reflects the power in the genre. Both substitute glitz for complexity and use histrionics to fill in the gaps left by lazy characterization, superficial storytelling, and a lack of sincere song-and-dance talent. While it may seem unfair to beat up on these contemporary examples of the cinematic category, a box set like The Rodgers and Hammerstein Collection reminds you just how great the filmic format can be. Sure, there are elements of cornball comedy and easy emotional resonance. Granted, there are occasions where a desire to cut to the chase, narratively speaking, leaves more questions unanswered than addressed. True, people who prefer the new, loud, and proud sense of showbiz might find these films—some more than 60 years old—to be like watching ancient ruins rot. But the truth is that Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II delivered the definitive version of the song-and-dance dynamic. From their first show to their last, the pair provided the world of entertainment with classic examples of artistry and expertise. Now (almost) all of them are contained in one amazing compilation.

Facts of the Case

Representing the following previously available DVD releases—Oklahoma! 50th Anniversary Edition, Carousel 50th Anniversary Edition, The King and I 50th Anniversary Edition, South Pacific Collector's Edition, State Fair 60th Anniversary Collectors Edition, and The Sound of Music 40th Anniversary Edition—this is one remarkable collection of musicals. True, it's a double dip, but when you've got titles and packages as profound as these, it doesn't really matter. Individually, the stories told are simple. Together, they represent some of the best writing, directing, acting, and singing the big-screen sonic extravaganza has to offer. Here are the basic plotlines:

Oklahoma! (1955)
A lovestruck cowboy named Curly (Gordon MacRae, Tea for Two) wants to woo a local farm girl named Laurey (Shirley Jones, Elmer Gantry). Unfortunately his stubborn nature gets in the way, and this allows farmhand Jud Fry (Rod Steiger, On the Waterfront) to make his move.

Carousel (1956)
When he sees his now-grown daughter suffering, Billy Bigelow (Gordon MacRae) escapes from Purgatory and returns to Earth, hoping to right the wrongs he left in the wake of his death. This includes making amends to his widow Julie (Shirley Jones). Sadly, he has only one day to turn things around.

The King and I (1956)
When recently widowed Anna Leonowens (Deborah Kerr, An Affair to Remember) agrees to become governess for the King of Siam (Yul Brenner, The Ten Commandments), she is ill-prepared for the culture shock or the romantic intrigue brewing beneath the surface of the Royal Court.

South Pacific (1958)
On a U.S. base on the Solomon Island, nurse Nellie Forbush (Mitzi Gaynor, Anything Goes) meets up with French planter Emile de Becque (Rossano Brazzi, The Italian Job). Their attraction is soon tested when de Becque is asked to be a scout for the American invasion of some nearby islands.

State Fair (1945/1962)
When the Franke family attends the annual State Fair, son Wayne (Dick Haymes/Pat Boone) and daughter Margy (Jeanne Crain/Pamela Tiffin) discover romance—she with a boy named Pat/Jerry (Dana Andrews/Bobby Darin), he with a girl named Emily (Vivian Blaine/Ann-Margaret).

The Sound of Music (1965)
When Captain von Trapp (Christopher Plummer, Murder by Decree) needs a nanny for his unruly children, the local convent sends him Maria (Julie Andrews, Mary Poppins), a novice nun in training. Their mutual attraction soon disrupts the entire von Trapp household, including the Captain's future wedding plans.

The Evidence

Though a tad incomplete when discussing the non-theatrical output of famed composers Richard Rodgers and his lyrical collaborator Oscar Hammerstein II (absent are the film Flower Drum Song and their TV take on Cinderella), what we have here is nothing less than an authoritative set of onscreen musicals at their very best—and excessive. Though they only produced 11 shows during their stint as a team, Rodgers and Hammerstein remain the last word in pre-contemporary musical theater. They introduced elements both obvious (lyrics representing character and emotion) and arcane (a score that suggests the subtext of the narrative, repeating and interlocking melodies and themes) to the genre, and walked away with a handful of Tonys and more than a few Oscars as a result. They brought down barriers when it came to content, and drove audiences to expect more from their typical song-and-dance extravaganza. They also were responsible for a Great White Way renaissance, reinvigorating the theater scene from the mid-'40s to the late '60s.

With only one effort here a direct-to-film effort (State Fair), what remains are examples of perfectly prepared shows, reconfigured and recast to play inside the motion-picture dynamic. In some cases, the changes are for the better (Carousel, The Sound of Music). In other instances, what worked well on stage (The King and I) can be a little off-putting blown up 40 feet high. Still, there is nary a clunker in the bunch and, thanks to Fox's attention to historic and aesthetic detail, each film is given a glorious DVD sheen. Before we get to the specs, here are some mini-reviews of each title. Let's begin with the show that started it all:

Oklahoma! (1955) Score: 95
It was the premiere heard 'round the theatrical world. When it opened in March 1943, theatergoers and critics were unprepared for what the new songwriting duo of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II had in store for them. Radical yet recognizable, moving without being maudlin, this new show was ingenious, inventive, and irresistible. It remains so, even splashed across the oversized silver screen. If anyone wants an example of what makes Rodgers and Hammerstein so special, Oklahoma! is it. With a score that plays like a compilation of the duo's greatest hits, and a near-perfect combination of story and song, this is no less than the birth of the modern American musical. Sure, Showboat is often viewed as the show that moved the art form away from the variety/revue format into productions where substance and score where truly intermingled. But Oklahoma! proved how popular the idea could be. As for the film, it introduced the world to the amazing singing talents of Shirley Jones, confirmed Gordon MacRae's status as the leading man of motion-picture musicals, and provided dark Method actor Rod Steiger the compelling and complex role of the villainous Jud Fry. From the sweeping vistas that compliment the opening number, "Oh, What a Beautiful Morning" to the surreal cowboy ballet (a high point of Agnes DeMille's crucial choreography), Oklahoma! is bursting with joy, energy, and imagination. It also argued for R&H's future within the medium.

Carousel (1956) Score: 97
Perhaps the most misunderstood and complex of the Rodgers and Hammerstein oeuvre, many see this semi-operatic take on death and atonements as being the bastard offspring of Oklahoma!'s massive success. More or less convinced they could do anything within the genre, the composers definitely pushed the envelope here, introducing complex songs that said as much about the narrative and its subtext as the dialogue, and playing with the appropriateness of character and subject matter. For all his genial Gordon MacRae mannerisms, Billy Bigelow is a good-for-nothing louse, a man who fails to support the woman he loves and ends up making a fatal decision to return to a life of crime rather than face his responsibilities. Julie, once again encapsulated by Shirley Jones's incredible acting and vocal skills, definitely deserves better, but it's amazing how much the men behind the story get us to care about these characters. Sure, some might balk at the afterlife-oriented perspective (how do the dead redeem themselves?), but the emotional content here is so strong that we simply get lost in it. Although not stifled by audience reactions (the viewing public adored the film), Fox instead focused on the other R&H title for 1956, The King and I and made a major push for Academy attention. King garnered nine nominations (including wins for star Yul Brenner) while Carousel failed to earn a single nod.

The King and I (1956) Score: 90
There is something about The King and I, especially in film form, that seems off-kilter and incorrect. Not just politically, mind you (even by old Siam standards, there's some sketchy material here), but in the overall scheme of storytelling. Perhaps it's the amazing star power of both Deborah Kerr and Yul Brenner. More or less born to play the King, Brenner is so overpowering that very little is left in his wake. Similarly, Kerr (whose singing was dubbed by famed behind-the-scenes songbird Marnie Nixon) is such a graceful actress that she imbues Anna with an emotional center that it striking in its complexity. These elements are not what your standard musical strives for. Along with the cutting of a few key songs ("I Have Dreamed," "Western People Funny," and "Shall I Tell You What I Think of You?") and questionable ethnic casting choices (Hispanic actors Rita Moreno and Carlos Rivas as Asians?), The King and I occasionally comes off as clunky and corny. Still, you can't deny the command inherent in the leads, and when Kerr and Brenner finally embrace to the tune of "Shall We Dance?," the movie is literally swept away on their combined charisma. Because of the narrative's sentimental trappings (there's a major amount of melodramatic material here), the film often comes across as a romance novel with songs. This is one of the more memorable achievements of R&H.

South Pacific (1958) Score: 89
It's interesting that for a duo who occasionally get ridiculed for the way they treat minorities (see the comments concerning The King and I or Flower Drum Song), Rodgers and Hammerstein ended up writing one of the best anti-prejudice pronouncements ever in a modern musical. "You've Got To Be Carefully Taught," with such amazing lyrical lines as "You've got to be taught before it's too late/before you are six or seven or eight/to hate all the people your relatives hate/you've got to be carefully taught!," gives the show an important social emphasis that many of the pair's productions lack. Based on James Michener's WWII memoirs and short story collection about his time in the service, both the book and the eventual Broadway production received the coveted Pulitzer Prize. Modern audiences may cringe at the overblown photographic concept employed by director Joshua Logan by which color filters are used to alter the mood of certain scenes. Because of a misunderstanding between the filmmaker and the studio, Fox amplified the effect, resulting in scenes that look lost in pinks and blues. Still, Mitzi Gaynor makes a stellar Nellie Forbush and, though most of the rest of the cast has their singing dubbed, the R&H score really shines. In addition to "Taught," this is the show featuring the fabulous "This Nearly Was Mine." As a matter of fact, South Pacific is perhaps a better experience sonically than it is dramatically or visually.

State Fair (1962) Score: 80
It seemed like a good idea at the time. In a near-perpetual state of looking for new material, Rodgers and Hammerstein felt a 1933 Academy Award nominee for Best Picture featuring Will Rogers just might do the trick. Its storyline, which suggested that a state fair represented a microcosm of America, seemed perfect for the duo to explore. Unfortunately, Fair never became a fan favorite. Even the remake (both the 1945 and 1962 versions are available in this set), which featured popular performers Pat Boone and Ann-Margaret, failed to find a devoted audience. Some suggest it's the bumpkin-like material, but a far more significant reason for the show's stumble seems possible. State Fair lacks the one element that makes a R&H production shine: good songs. "It Might as Well Be Spring" remains the sole standout moment in what is otherwise an undistinguished set of tunes. While the pair couldn't create a completely atonal mess even if they tried, the material here just doesn't have the pop of other Rodgers and Hammerstein productions. It has to be said that looking at the two films side by side offers clear indications of how Hollywood can undermine even the best intentions. In 1945 (and the original show), Iowa was the location. But for some reason, Texas and its annual carnival were used for the 1962 update. Seems sort of antithetical to what the composers had created originally.

The Sound of Music (1965) Score: 98
Something strange has happened to this Academy Award-winning Best Picture over the last decade. Instead of being revered as the stellar piece of musical entertainment that it is, The Sound of Music has become a celebrated camp classic. Ignoring the monumental work of Julie Andrews, in a role requiring an incredible level of emotional and vocal prowess, people dress up Rocky Horror Picture Show-style and attend kitschy sing-along showings. As part of the public's deconstruction of the cinematic song-and-dance extravaganza as it refuses to be pulled in by this type of film's fantastical elements (basically, individuals breaking out in song), The Sound of Music has had to suffer through an unnecessary cultural adjustment. It's too bad it can't simply be appreciated for what it is—an epic of melodious magnificence. With tunes ranging from the simplistic ("Do, Re, Mi") to the heartbreakingly beautiful ("Edelweiss"), what seemed somewhat baroque onstage (where R&H stalwart Mary Martin was Maria and Theodore Bickel was a beefy Capt. Von Trapp) is transformed by Robert Wise's directorial decisions into a sweeping saga of love and loyalty against the gorgeous Swiss Alps. Some can complain that the film is too wholesome or hokey, but the truth is that cinema doesn't get more compelling than this wonderfully evocative experience. To consider it cheesy is ridiculous. It's not tasteless; it's timeless.

As a result, what we end up with is nothing short of a true testament to the musical's endearing qualities. We are also witness to the genre's maturation. While it's hard to compare the two distinct styles, the Rodgers and Hammerstein shows are worlds away—in content and approach—to the merry MGM spectacles of the '30s and '40s, and light years removed from the randy rock operatics that would come to define the late '60s and early '70s. In addition, we learn something incredibly unique about this era in entertainment. As stated before in other reviews, the musical used to dominate popular culture. The songs were part of the hit parade, and would eventually find themselves sandwiched into the standard cultural catalog. So many of the tunes here have become benchmarks of composition that the lack of said facet from modern shows (quick, name the "hit" from Avenue Q) is really telling. Whether it's because of the care and craft R&H put into them, or how well these movie versions hold up, it is safe to say that people will be discussing Oklahoma! and The Sound of Music long after Wicked works its way through its final road company curtain call. A box set like this is pure motion-picture manna.

From a purely technological standpoint, the transfers and images offered as part of this package run the gamut from great to gobsmacking. State Fair (1945) arrives in a 1.33:1 full-screen image. The 1962 remake is presented in a 2.35:1 anamorphic widescreen presentation. So are both versions of South Pacific, the Todd-AO version of Oklahoma!, and The Sound of Music. Finally, the Cinemascope offering of Oklahoma!, as well as the standard versions of The King and I, and Carousel are all mastered in a 2.55:1 anamorphic widescreen configuration. For the most part, these prints are pristine. The colors are vibrant, the flesh tones are fixed, and the amount of detail generated is astounding. Many have complained about the manner in which Fox treated these titles before. From a visual standpoint, all such criticisms should now be silenced.

As for the all-important element of sound, one has to remember the era in which these films were made. Stereo was never a consideration, and mixes were frequently flat and limited by the mono-only equipment. Remixes have been attempted, but don't expect some kind of sonic epiphany. Individually, you will hear State Fair (1945) presented in a Dolby Digital Stereo 2.0 and Mono 1.0 offering. The 1962 version is given a 4.0 Surround presentation. Oklahoma! gets 5.0 Surround and 2.0 Stereo, as does Carousel, South Pacific (both presentations), The King and I, and The Sound of Music.

Since three of the DVD presentations have not been reviewed on site (State Fair, Sound of Music, and Oklahoma! have all been addressed by Judges Brian Pope and Jesse Ataide), they will become our primary focus. Easily the best of the bunch, Carousel contains a collection of stellar complementary materials. Disc One offers up a commentary track featuring star Shirley Jones and documentary filmmaker Nick Redman. Jones does a good job of dishing the dirt on the production, thanks in part to Redman's excellent questioning. She is particularly good about putting the film into perspective, and argues for its acceptance as one of R&H's greatest efforts. She'll get no arguments here. Also included on this first DVD are an isolated musical score track, a chance to sing along karaoke style to the songs, and an option to quickly skip through to each melodious moment.

Disc Two begins with an amazing added feature—the full-length Fritz Lang film that Carousel was based on in part, 1934's Liliom. Presented in a gorgeous monochrome transfer, this fairly faithful version of the Franz Molnár play features Charles Boyer in a magnificent turn as the title character, a disreputable carnival barker who…well, you know the story. Much darker than the musical, this combination of melodrama and German Expressionism is a real treat. Add in a full-length documentary on the production itself, some sequences offering stage versions of the show, a couple of audio-only deleted songs, and newsreel footage, and you've got a wonderfully exhaustive digital package.

The King and I takes a similar approach to all the discs here. First up is a commentary, this time with film scholar Richard Barrios and musical theater historian Michael Portantiere. Both men are highly knowledgeable and keep the conversation from turning into a dry dissertation on the film. In addition, the same features found on all these releases—isolated musical score, a chance to sing along karaoke style to the songs, and an option to quickly skip through to each melodious moment—are present here as well. Disc Two delivers six featurettes covering all aspects of the show, a re-creation of a dropped song (audio and stills), a few newsreel clips, and one intriguing oddity. Back in the early '70s, a sitcom version of the original play was prepared, with Yul Brenner reprising his role and Samantha Egger signed on as his new Anna. With a supplemental commentary by the actress, we get a chance to see the pilot—and pity the poor people who thought this show would work in a 30-minute format.

The South Pacific set starts off with another alternate narrative track, this time featuring Rodgers and Hammerstein Organization President Ted Chaplin and musical theater writer Gerard Alessandrini. It's a historical, heavy overview of the production, and may be a little too insular for some fans. Thankfully, those looking for pure song-and-dance delights can enjoy the isolated musical score, a chance to sing along karaoke style to the songs, and an option to quickly skip through to each melodious moment. Disc Two delivers another shocking supplement, the original Road Show version of the film. Although it adds 15 more minutes to the overall running time (from 157 minutes to 172!) and nothing but superfluous subplot fluff, a commentary by a returning Richard Barrios helps put the edits into perspective. There's another in-depth documentary, a look at the Broadway version of two key songs (featuring Mary Martin and Enzio Pinza), and an hour-long Diane Sawyer interview with James Michener. Returning to the Pacific islands where his Pulitzer Prize-winning book began, the author is eager to share his war experiences and discuss the rampant racism of the era (he later married a Japanese woman).

Add in the previously discussed DVDs, and it's clear that this release is one of 2006's best. Not just for what it includes in the way of bonus features, but how said extras explain and underscore each film.

Closing Statement

Whenever one is faced with such daunting talent and unique personal acumen, the question usually follows as to why there aren't more examples of Rodgers and Hammerstein out there. It's not like they were uniquely necessary to each other. Each one did amazing work in conjunction with other collaborators both before and after their partnership. Similarly, there have been other voices—Meredith Wilson, Frank Loesser—of their era which made an equally important impression on the genre. In retrospect, it seems R&H were both incredibly gifted and incredibly lucky. They arrived at a time when the format needed a boost, and believed so mightily in their style that they never sold out or strove to pander. As a result, we have a catalog of classics, an oeuvre that oozes quality, invention, and timelessness. Even if you're sour on a couple of the titles included, this DVD box set is almost mandatory, especially for anyone who considers themselves a student of musical theater. While others have since expanded and exploited what Rodgers and Hammerstein accomplished during their time together, no one has bettered them. The proof lies within these stellar examples of stagecraft.

The Verdict

Not guilty. This is a great set of films, and a great box set to boot.

Give us your feedback!

Did we give The Rodgers And Hammerstein Collection a fair trial? yes / no

Share This Review


Follow DVD Verdict


Other Reviews You Might Enjoy

• Fun In Acapulco
• Lullaby Of Broadway
• Oklahoma!: 50th Anniversary Edition
• Lured

DVD Reviews Quick Index

• DVD Releases
• Recent DVD Reviews
• Search for a DVD review...

Genres

• Classic
• Concerts and Musicals

Scales of Justice, State Fair

Video: 95
Audio: 90
Extras: 95
Acting: 95
Story: 93
Judgment: 94

Perp Profile, State Fair

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• Full Frame
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 100 Minutes
Release Year: 1945
MPAA Rating: Rated G

Distinguishing Marks, State Fair

• Audio Commentary by Film Historian Richard Barrios and Tom Briggs
• "From Page to Screen to Stage" Featurette
• Singalong Karaoke
• Still Galleries
• Theatrical Trailer

Scales of Justice, Oklahoma!

Video: 95
Audio: 90
Extras: 95
Acting: 95
Story: 93
Judgment: 94

Perp Profile, Oklahoma!

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.55:1 Anamorphic (Cinemascope)
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic (Todd-AO)
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 5.0 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 145 Minutes
Release Year: 1955
MPAA Rating: Rated G

Distinguishing Marks, Oklahoma!

• Audio Commentary by Ted Chaplin and Hugh Fordin
• Audio Commentary by Shirley Jones and Nick Redman
• Singalong Karaoke
• Theatrical Trailer
• "CinemaScope vs. Todd-AO" Featurette
• "The March of Todd-AO" Featurette
• "The Miracle of Todd-AO" Featurette
• Vintage Stage Excerpt from 1954 Tribute to Rodgers and Hammerstein
• Singalong Karaoke
• Still Galleries
• Theatrical Trailer

Scales of Justice, Carousel

Video: 95
Audio: 90
Extras: 95
Acting: 95
Story: 93
Judgment: 94

Perp Profile, Carousel

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.55:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 5.0 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 128 Minutes
Release Year: 1956
MPAA Rating: Rated G

Distinguishing Marks, Carousel

• Audio Commentary by Shirley Jones and Nick Redman
• Isolated Musical Score
• Song-Only Option
• Singalong Karaoke
• 1934 film Liliam
• "Turns of the Carousel" Featurette
• Vintage Stage Excerpt
• Stills and Audio from Deleted Numbers
• Fox Movietone News
• Behind-the-Scenes Still Photo Gallery
• Theatrical Trailer

Scales of Justice, The King And I

Video: 95
Audio: 90
Extras: 95
Acting: 95
Story: 93
Judgment: 94

Perp Profile, The King And I

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.55:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 5.0 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 133 Minutes
Release Year: 1956
MPAA Rating: Rated G

Distinguishing Marks, The King And I

• Audio Commentary by Film Historian Richard Barrios and Michael Portantiere
• Isolated Musical Score
• Song-Only Option
• Singalong Karaoke
• Anna and the King TV Pilot with Commentary from Star Samantha Egger
• Six Production Featurettes
• Vintage Stage Excerpts
• Stills and Audio from Deleted Numbers
• Fox Movietone News

Scales of Justice, South Pacific

Video: 95
Audio: 90
Extras: 95
Acting: 95
Story: 93
Judgment: 94

Perp Profile, South Pacific

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 5.0 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (English)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (French)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 171 Minutes
Release Year: 1958
MPAA Rating: Rated G

Distinguishing Marks, South Pacific

• Audio Commentary by Ted Chaplin and Gerard Alessandrini
• Song-Only Option
• Singalong Karaoke
• Extended Road Show Version of South Pacific
• Audio Commentary by Film Historian Richard Barrios
• "Making of South Pacific" Featurette
• Diane Sawyer Takes James Michener Back to the Islands of Tales from the South Pacific
• Vintage Stage Excerpts
• Fox Movietone News
• Mitzi Gaynor Screen Test
• Theatrical Trailer

Scales of Justice, State Fair

Video: 95
Audio: 90
Extras: 95
Acting: 95
Story: 93
Judgment: 94

Perp Profile, State Fair

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 4.0 Surround (English)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 118 Minutes
Release Year: 1962
MPAA Rating: Rated G

Distinguishing Marks, State Fair

• Audio Commentary by Pat Boone
• Vintage Stage Excerpt from 1954 Tribute to Rodgers and Hammerstein
• Rare State Fair Television Pilot
• Theatrical Trailer

Scales of Justice, The Sound Of Music

Video: 95
Audio: 90
Extras: 95
Acting: 95
Story: 93
Judgment: 94

Perp Profile, The Sound Of Music

Studio: Fox
Video Formats:
• 2.35:1 Anamorphic
Audio Formats:
• Dolby Digital 5.0 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround (English)
• Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround (French)
• Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono (Spanish)
Subtitles:
• English
• Spanish
Running Time: 174 Minutes
Release Year: 1965
MPAA Rating: Rated G

Distinguishing Marks, The Sound Of Music

• Introduction by Julie Andrews
• Audio Commentary with Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer
• Audio Commentary with Director Robert Wise
• Singalong Karaoke
• "A Few of my Favorite Things" Featurette
• "Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer: A Reminiscence" Featurette
• "On Location with Charmain Carr" Featurette
• "From Leisl to Gretl: A 40th Anniversary Reunion" Featurette
• "When You Know the Notes to Sing: A SINGALONG Phenomenon" Featurette
• "The von Trapp Family: Harmony and Discord" Biography Special
• Restoration Comparison
• Mia Farrow Screen Test
• Trailers and TV Spots
• Photo Galleries








DVD | Blu-ray | Upcoming DVD Releases | About | Staff | Jobs | Contact | Subscribe | Find us on Google+ | Privacy Policy

Review content copyright © 2007 Bill Gibron; Site design and review layout copyright © 2014 Verdict Partners LLC. All rights reserved.